June 1889

LIVERPUDLIANA; BY RICHARD SAMEUL
Cricket and Football Field - Saturday 01 June 1889
THE NEW PROFESSIONALISMS
Everyone will congratulate Mr. Barclay on the success which has attended the action of the Northern clubs, taken at the initiative of the Everton Secretary.  A lot of Everton’s weakness during the present season has been attributable to the determination of the Committee to refrain from the veiled professionalism which stranded the club last season, and to seek paid players only where signatures they could legally affix to the Association professional form.  At the same time the Committee took steps to do away with a rule which was more honoured in the breach than in the observance and their action has led to the revolutionizing of the Professional Rules.  The field for operations being new so considerably widened, we my expect something of enterprise and look with confidence to the success of the Executive in the securing of players capable of making a great name for the club.  At the same time, there is now an end of that wretched system by which Scotch amateurs were “conveyed” from one-club to another in all the excitement of the season and to the disgust of all who wish well to the gate.  A considerable accessions to the professional ranks is inevitable.  The laws of supply and demand will as inevitably affect the astounding prices of some of these quasi amateurs.  It is to be hoped, however, that young fellows will weight well the situation, before committing themselves to a purely professional football career, and breaking away from the bright promise of some useful occupation.  That is the best professionalism which secures a youth a safe position and useful influence at his own occupation, besides offering to him the true value of his services as a football player.  For the risk undergone in the severe struggles of modern football, is clearly deserving of some peculiarly equivalent. 

ACCRINGTON AT EVERTON
Cricket and Football Field - Saturday 01 June 1889
By Mickey Free
Three times this season have Accrington and Everton met-twice at home, once away.  On the latter occasion I need hardly say that Everton with their proverbial ill luck lost, but won both matches at home, so that is a little consolation.  Saturday’s contest was like most matches played at this time of year, and yet it was hardly devoid of interest, and it certainly was well supported by the public.  Everton scored twice, but with peculiar perverseness which seems to actuate the best of referees at times, the real goal, i.e., the second one, scored by Geary, was a good deal, but was ruled offside, whilst the first one which was allowed was as palpably offside as anything of the kind I ever saw.  Everton lost the toss, and had the privilege of facing a strong sun and light breeze.  The game had not lasted long before the absence of “jud” was felt by the Reds.  Fecitt and Geary made a demonstration against the Accrington goal, but “hands” off Fenn upset the movement, and immediately afterwards Barbour gave Smalley a nice little job.  A smart scuffle between Fecitt, Chadwick, Tattersall and Chippendale roused the spectators a bit, and then Gallocher looked mischievous, but Dobson rolled him over and reclined gracefully upon Paddy’s anatomy amidst considerable laughter.  The end came as stated.  One thing which struck me was that had the Everton wing men fed Geary as unselfishly as he fed them, the score might have been augmented.  Further, it was all improvement when Geary went on the right and Parry centre, as the wings could then suit their pace to that off Parry, who is anything but a flyer, and the play was better after the move described.  Bethel, Robinson played better than he has yet done here, Dobson stopped a couple of shots which might have scored, and yet Smalley had more to do than he has had for many a day and he did it in capital style.  Before winding up the season I cannot help having just a few words more on the subject of the little unpleasantness which has occurred between one of the officials and myself.  I am sure it a matter of sincere regret to me, nevertheless it would not matter so much if he whom the cap appeared to fit had only been gentleman enough to stick to facts and not rush into ridiculous personalities.  I made certain assertions, the truth of which must have been apparent to every regular attendant at the Everton enclosure, and this was done, not with the view of throwing mud, but in the hope that even at the eleventh hour they would see the error of their ways, turn over a new leaf and avoid such pitfalls another season or at any rate let the executive see themselves as others see them.  Now, sir, a man who sets himself up as a model of courtesy should have a good memory, and a clear perception of the mote and been parable.  I have not forgotten my visit with the Everton team to Nottingham north a simple incident which happened on that occasion, and I should like to propound a conundrum and ask what hearing the events of that day had towards bringing about the extraordinary occurrence of a club like Everton sending their team away to Stoke unaccompanied by a single member either of the club or committee, with the result that “Mr. Free” was called on (not to play centre forward) but to leave the Press seat and act as umpire, and afterwards go through the necessary formalities attendant on League matches?  Again, I must request the Everton secretary to be good enough to read my remarks once more.  I quoted N.J. Ross as an authority on football, not as a critic on the action of the committee.  Once again I reiterate my assertion respecting the players of the reserve team who were present and available for the Burnley match.  As a matter of fact Mr. Barclay was in Southport at the time and cannot speak of his own knowledge whereas I could name the men who were there.  “Mr. Free” is only anxious to see the club well managed and prosperous, therefore had he received much a ridiculous invitation as that referred to by Mr. Barclay when attempts to be humorous, no one would have been less surprised than the individual referred to, as it would have been thoroughly in keeping with the suicidal policy of “pick up” observed right throughout the season.  The annual meeting, let me add, is to be held on Thursday, 6th June. 

THE EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
Cricket and Football Field - Saturday 01 June 1889
Sir- I have read with interest the dispute between “Mickey Free” and Mr. Barclay, and am of the same opinions as the former, viz, that the playing team has been mismanaged.  “Mickey” is right he said that there were left-wing forwards available when Mike Higgins played for Everton in that position against Burnley.  I am surprised at Mr. Barclay rushing into print and telling the readers of your valuable paper to take what “Mickey” says with “a grain of salt,” who he knows every word is truth and not more idle gossip.  Another case of mismanagement only occurred last Saturday.  W. Briscoe got a notice that he was to play against Accrington and when he undressing was politely told that he need not do so as Fenn would play in his place.  How long has Fenn been a better player than Briscoe?  Another case of letting Mr. Molyneux have so much to say at committee meetings when he is not a member-yours &c, RATTLER.

NUGGETS
Cricket and Football Field - Saturday 01 June 1889

  • When is Alf Jones, of Polycarpse, to get his place in the Everton Reserve team?

EVERTON 2 BOLTON 2
June 1 1889. The Liverpool Mercury
This the last match of the season was not patronised as well as usual. About 3000 spectators were present, and they seemed well pleased at the exciting and excellent game resulted. Barbour started against the wind and sun but Geary intercepted and, Chadwick put in a good shot, which caused Harrison to use his hands. Geary then followed with another, but Robinson headed away and the visiting forwards by excellent passing gave Davenport a possible chance which Smalley cleared. Everton maintained a heavy pressure for some time and while Parry attended to Harrison, Chadwick shot through, amidst cheering. Upon the re-start Almond became very busy,, and repeatedly nipped the well meant passes of Brogan, Barbour, and Weir and by judicious half-back play gave the home forwards several chances. Turner got away and centre to Brogan and with a long shot he defeated Smalley. Shortly after, half-time was called. The combination of Milward and Chadwick improved, and by Geary assistance Milward became very troublesome to Robinson and Harrison, his screw being exceedingly well judged. D.Weir and Barbour at length defeated Dobson and J.Weir and gave to Turner, who scored, but Mr. Lythgoe did not allow a strong appeal for off-side. The home team, in no way disheartened kept up the pace, and after a long period of even play Chadwick again shot through,, while Geary and Parry looked after the goalkeeper. Time being shortly called, an excellent game resulted in a draw 2 goals each. Teams. Everton:- Smalley, goal, Wilson, and Dobson (captain) backs Weir, Almond, and Farmer half-backs, Fenn Parry, Geary, Chadwick, and Milward, forwards. Bolton Wanderers: - Harrison, goal Robinson, and Kucas, backs, Bullough, Crombie and Roberts, half-backs Davenport, Brogan Harbour, Weir (d) and Turner forwards .

EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
June 7 1889. The Liverpool Daily post
The annual general meeting of the above club was held last evening at the brilliant rooms of the Sandon Hotel. Mr.Councillor John Houlding was in the chair, and about two hundred members were present. The secretary report was the first item on the list and after Sir Barclay had waded through a long written speech, a resolution was adopted thanking him for his services in obtaing the passing of the rule allowing the immediate registration of Scotch and other players. The item of interest now came on-viz, the treasurer reports, and amid deep interest and attention. Mr.Wilson read his balance sheet of which, the following is an account: - Receipts-Balance in hand (June 1889 £17 3s 11d) gate receipts upto may 31, 1889. £4328 13s 1d; members subscription, £148 4s. Amount received for advertising on boarding (Less £8 returned for infringement agreements) £18, insurance allowance (Dick and Costley) £6; total £4,511 1s.

Payments: - players wages; £1,144 14s 6d; travelling expenses £408, 17s.2d; insurance's of players £20 16s, medical expanses £18 6s; special account £60 15s; general expanses £40 12s; 6d, training expenses £23 13s 6d; trainers wages £55 15s; materials; £60 15s; 3d. Referee £48 14s; 1d; ground maintains; £970 10s 10d; groundmen ‘s wages £37 1s; rent £150; rates and taxes £29 2s 3d; police £74 14s 1d; commission £170 5s 10d; printing and stationary £96 9s 4d; advertising £61 11s; 7d; postage and telegrams £29 18s; 7d; visiting clubs £966 18s; 6d; entertainment etc; £17 15s; deputation expanses A.Dick £5; 4s, bank interest 10s; cash in hand (banks £8 14s 6d; treasurer £5 8s 3d), £14 2d 9d; total £618 1s. The account were certified by Messrs. R.H.Webster, and W.Henderson, but after they had been audited a bill for £38 1s 4d was presented which, when settled, will leave the club in debt to the amount of £23 18s 7d. After several pointed and searching questions had been asked in reference to above, the Chairman stated that the balance-sheet had been subjected to a close and critical examination by reliable auditors, and therefore upon a proposition he would declare the balance sheet passed. The following officers were than elected: - President Mr'J Houlding; vice president (on committee); Messrs. Barclay and Haworth, secretary Messrs; Jackson and Moyneux, treasurers; and Messrs Berry, Brockes, Fleming, Coates, Williams, Clayton, and Currier, members of committee.

LIVERPUDLIANA; BY RICHARD SAMUEL
Cricket and Football Field - Saturday 15 June 1889
THE EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
The annual meeting of this club, heralded with such prognostications and forebodings, has passed away in calm.  Mr. Barclay has triumphed.  His resignation has been announced-I believe I put it forth on one occasion-but he is, as a matter of fact, at the present moment, more securely installed in the position of secretary of the Everton Club than ever.  It is the triumph of individuality over the crowd.  It cannot be denied that the Everton secretary made himself very unpopular with the players last season; that he did not command the confidence of a big section of the members of the club; but his force of character rises superior to such trifles, and his able statement at the annual meeting was a complete vindication of himself and his committee, and a complete answer to the critics, who have, not without reason, animadverted on the action of the club executive.  It is one of the discomforts of greatness to be always placed in an electric glare, and Mr. Barclay, as the guide of the destinies of such a big concern as the Everton Football Club, needs not to exclaim against the critics.  It is wasted energy.  The “chapter of accidents” is irrefutable, but it is also undeniable that an expenditure of £1,146 on players does not represent value for money.  The action of the Committee with respect of quasi-amateurism was “correct” but questions will suggest themselves concerning the levers which moved Coyne and Davie, and McKinnon and Augus, to the neighbourhood of Anfield-rd.  The result of the season’s work is certainly a disappointment, but I quite agree with Mr. Barclay in asserting that the value of the reserve players too often obtains a fictitious expression by the display against second rate clubs.  Both Keys and Briscoe, players specially marked for notice in this connection, have sometimes shown promise of useful service, but have most frequently proved conspicuous failures in the first team.  There was a pleasant ring in the visiting teams in Mr. Barclay’s speech, as there was reason in his plea for less factious criticism, and more loyal support of the Committee by the members of the club.  With regard to the new officials, there is a complete severance of the connection with the old Everton, all the new officials being of the new school.  The suggestion of a limited liability company does not commend itself to many of the purely sport-loving members; and for my part I must express my utter dislike at such a tendency of football, although, at the same time I fain must acknowledge that a turnover of £4,300 requires something beyond the indiscriminate disbursement of an ordinary football club executive. 

NUGGETS
Cricket and Football Field - Saturday 15 June 1889

  • Deepdalians are not frightened at the threats uttered out Everton way.

NUGGETS
Cricket and Football Field - Saturday 22 June 1889

  • Footballers are awaiting with interest the hearing of the case Everton F.C., v. Gordon.

NUGGETS
Cricket and Football Field - Saturday 29 June 1889

  • Gordon’s case will come before the Liverpool Vice-Chanceller’s Court.