September 1895



BLUES 0 WHITES 4 August 26 1895. The Liverpool Mercury
The Everton Club turned out two elevens for a practice game on Saturday, before a large and enthusiasts crowd. The usual arrangements of playing the strongest forwards team on one side against the strongest defence on the other was adopted and a very pleasant and fairly fast game resulted. The Whites forward team comprising Latta, Bell, Hartley, Chadwick, and Milward, was a very smart lot, and worked nicely together. Four goals resulted from their efforts and Hillman, the blue goalkeeper, seemed to have no chance, the shot that scored. He however, brought off two or three very fine saves. Notably from Bell and Hartley. The latter appears to be in very good form at present, his speed in some instance bring exceptions. The Blue half backs and backs were Goldie, Storrier, Stewart, Adams Arridge and all played very creditably, the first named being undoubtedly as acquisition of the Blue forwards McInnes stood out prominently, and was very fast and tricky. A very much improved player in McDonald, the young back who was signed on last season. All the men seemed to have improved vastly since the first public game, but one or two of them still require to lose a little fresh. Today the club holds its annual picnic and sports at freshfields. Teams Blues: - Hillman, goal, Adams, and Arridges, backs, Gokdie, Storrier, and Stewart, halfbacks, Williams, McInnes, Reay, Flewitt, and Murray forwards. Whites: - Cook, goal, McDonald, and Parry, backs Kelso, Meiklehjohn, and Elliott, halfbacks, Latta, Bell, Hartley, Chadwick and Milward forwards .

 

EVERTON F.C. PICNIC AND SPORTS

August 27 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The annual picnic and sports organised by the Everton Football Club Company, Limited took place yesterday. A start was made shortly before noon from the Spellow House Hotel, a party of from 60 to 70 players Stewarts and officials of the club having assembled. The weather was somewhat dull, nut a drive from Goodison Park to the Grapes Hotel Freshfield, proved thoroughly enjoyable. On arrival a short programme of sports was gone through, the events being handicaps over distances of 100 yards, 440 yards, and one mile. W.Handford (8 yards) won the 100 yards, followed home by W.Wiliiam (5 yards) and S.Arridge, while J.W.Bell (8 yards) A.Milward (12 yards) and J.Elliott (8 yards) finished the quarter mile in the order indicated. D.Storrier (30 yards) H.Goldie won the mile (60 yards) being second, and A.Gilbert (third). An interesting football match between the directors and stewards of the club followed. After a several pleasant bowling tournaments on the excellent green, which adjoins the hotel, justice was done to a palatable and substantial dinner. The routs for the return journey was via, Bigwood, Thornton, and Aintree. Frequent showers of rain fell during the afternoon and evening, but the day was nevertheless one, which will be pleasantly remembered. Mr.R.Molyneux (secretary) efficiently arranged the programme, and the directors present were Dr.Baxter (chairman), Messrs Clayton (vice chairman), Kelly, Davies, Cuff, Bainbridge, Leyland, Hawshaw, and Prescott.

 

SEPTEMBER 1895

 

OPENING OF THE SEASON

September 2 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Today the resign of the football begins in real earnest, and the club managers, wherever it has been practicable, have spared no efforts in serving up the fare to their supporters at the first possible opportunity. Those state executives who, profiting from past experience have had their teams well under control during the month of August no doubt, find the ‘'athletic preparations fully exemplified before today is over; while those teams that replying upon former prestige don the jersey with a superfluity of flesh and a costing of rest, will find themselves left at the post. For an example of the inestimable value of careful preliminary training we need to go no further afield than Everton. A couple of seasons ago, early training was more or less a lackadaisical character, with the result that there matches were lost during the first month. It is absolutely essential that a team should be in the best of condition even for the first engagement, and last season the Everton executive were fully alive to this, for by the time the glorious first had arrival the men were in the pink of condition. And what was the result? A long list of successes both at home and away. This year, too, the management have adopted the same methods as last year, and assiduous training supplemented by practice games, which partook even the nature of League contests, have been occupying the attention of the supporters of the club during the past mouth, and no doubt the team will profit by the strict attention to training when they take part in the first League match against Sheffield Wednesday at Goodison Park this evening. There is very little is new record of the Everton club. The fixtures are much the same as usual- that is, they are made up chiefly of league engagements cup ties, and a few ‘'friendlies'' of the better class among the last named being those with Glasgow Rangers, Celtic, St.Mirren Hearts of Midlothians Sunderland, Casuals and Woolwich Arsenal, but the absence of the Liverpool Club from the list is much to be regretted, and it is hoped that ere long the difficulty of arranging fixtures will be overcome. With regard to the personnel of the team, it will be found almost identical with that of last season, and should occasion require the committee will have at hand very capable reserves to call upon for every position in the fill. A few days ago the outlook was not so promising, inasmuch as the settlement with Holt had not been effected; but now the matter have been amicable arrannged, and that there is to be upheaval in the half back line, one cannot but look for the success of the term with every degree of confidence. Judging from practice games, the attacking line in all that can be desired, and Boyle (who captains the team) and Stewart will be found as brimful of resource, as ever, while Kelso who has if anything much improved, can with Arridge be depended upon against the best of company, and Hillman, who at the practice game appeared more agile than ever, will not be found wanting in cleverness. The new men have given general satisfaction, so that difficulty in selecting a team even under the most adverse conditions will be reduced to a minimum. The second team of Everton will be members of the Football combination, and with such resources at their command it is safe to predict a clean sheet at the close of the season. The clubs forming the Combination this year are Chester, Everton Glossop North End, Leek, Macclesfield, Northwich Victoria, and Oldham County.

 

EVERTON V SHEFFIELD WEDNSDAY

September 3, 1895. Birmingham Daily Post

At Liverpool. Play started at 5.47, and Everton having made a futile attack, Bell gave Wednesday the first goal from a free kick against Storrier. Everton's shooting was wild, but the Sheffield goal had one narrow escape. A few minutes later Bell again scored, putting Wednesday two ahead. So far Everton had been overplayed, although Chadwick almost scored just before the interval. Half-time; Sheffield 2, Everton 0. When play was resumed about fourteen thousand spectators were present. Free kicks to Everton prove abortive, and Hillman saved brilliantly, while a few minutes later Storrier shot over. From a free kick Allan saved cleverly, and again Everton were in front without result until Boyle scored; next Hartley put through and equalised. Result; A draw, 2 goals each.

 

 

EVERTON 2 SHEFFIELD WEDNESDAY 2 (game 183)

September 3 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Charming weather more settled for Cricket than football, there was a fairly good lining of spectators, at Goodison Park. The teams, as will be seen from the list below, were much the same as last year. L.Bell playing centre for Wednesday, while Storrier was requisitioned to Holt position. At 5-45 the teams faced in the following in front of 12,000 spectators . Everton: - Hiillman, goal Kelso, and Arridges backs, Boyle (captain), Storrier, and Stewart halfbacks, Williams Bell Hartley, Chadwick, and Milward, forwards. Sheffield Wednesday: - Allan, goal, Earp (captain), and Langley, backs, Petrice, Crawshaw, and Jamieson, halfbacks, Brash, Ferrier, Bell, Brady, and Spikesley forwards. Referee Mr. Armitt. The Sheffield Skipper won the toss, and Hartley facing the glaring sun set the ball in motion. The first movements were somewhat sturdy eventually Arridge opened the game for Williams but he overran himself and then Earp had cleared ably. Milward and Chadwick made a dash on the left, which resulted in the former screwing the ball onto the top of the net. The Wednesday forwards broke away in nice combination, when Storrier unfortunately foul an opponent, and from the free kick, Bell head through the game having being in progess about five minutes. Sheffield become very aggressive and Hillman saving from Spikseley and other forwards in great style. At Length Bell scored a second point from the Sheffield club. At Length grand work by Hartley, Milward and Chadwick almost brought about the desired point, and a moment later afterwards the last named player under great difficulties sent in a grand shot which, justed needed a touch from Bell, but this was not forthcoming and the whistle sounded immediately afterwards for the interval. Sheffield leading by two goals to nil. A few minutes after resuming a splendid opening was given to Hartley in front of goal there being practically no opponents but a miskick enabled Langley to get up in time to clear. The luck continued to favour the visitors who were often fortunate in meeting the ball when banged into goal, and the height of disappointment was reached as a couple of free kicks in good position were got away in neat easy fashion. A visit to the other end brought out Hillman to brash, and again to Bell, the custodian's judgement in dealing with the latter's attempt to rush the ball through being very fine indeed. Diverting the ball from Bell's toe, to gave possession to Milward who in conjunction with his partner, worked it nicely down only to receive feeable assistance from the halves Storrier especially being faulty. Hartley headed in beautifully to Allen who brought of a smart save and almost immediately afterwards the Wednesday goal had another marvellous escape. At length a long shot from Boyle took effect twelve minutes from time, and on getting to work again the Evertonians fairly bore down on the Sheffield goal. One of their all but put the teams on equal terms, the corner kick being the first that had taken place in the match. Three minutes later Hartley scored the equaling goal from a well-placed corner by Chadwick. A chance to take the lead was given to Hartley, but he shot skied the net. Towards the close the Wednesday forwards made a big effort, and Hillman was thrice called upon. Kicking out in the last stage was a frequently manourve of the Wednesday backs, but no further points were scored, and a good game resulted of two goals each. From an Everton point of view the game was most disappointing. Although individually the play was good there was not that equanimity and cohesion action, among the players which, one has been accountioned to witness. This effort of the forwards were spasmodic in character, and had they in the first half infused but a mostly of the vigor that characteristic their movements in the second portion when they played an absolutely winning game, success with a substantial margin, must have attended them. The halve were at time rocky, and Holt's reappearance in the team will be anxiously awaited. The backs and goalkeeper had an exacting time, and came out fairly well. The Wednesday team, as a whole are a well balanced lot, and should have a good season, though the two point that they scored and the marvellous saves that were effected under the most unlooked for conditions Stamped them at any rate last evening as a very lucky team.

 

LIVERPOOL AND DISTRICT COMBINATION 1 EVERTON 5

September 4 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

This match, in aid of the funds of the Liverpool and District Association, was played lastnight on the new ground of the St. Elphine Club. Warrington, and resulted in a win for Everton by 5 goals to 1. The teams were as follows: - Everton: - Cook, goal, McDonald and Parry, backs, Jones, Holt, and Elliott halfbacks, Reay, Murray, Mainman Flewitt, and Scholield forwards. Liverpool and District Combination: - J.W.Robson, (captain), (warrington St Elphin's) goal, Taylor (c) (st Elphins), and McFarland (j) (Hudson's Athletci), backs, Fox (m) (Edgehill and Wavertree), Hughes (h) (Formby), and Molyneux (Kirkdale) hlafbacjs, Ireland (w) (Garston Copper Works), Cunningham (j) (Hudson Athletics), Dugdale (j) (warrington St. Elphins), Price (j) (Garston Copper Works), and Marr (j) (Hudson's Athletci) forwards.

 

EVERTON 6 NOTTS FOREST 2 (game 184)

September 9 1895. THE Liverpool Mercury

Notts Forest, who had so creditably disposed of the Bury team on Thurdsay, furnished the attraction at Goodison Park on Saturday, and at the commencement of the game a crowd of about 15,000 strong, which increased in numbers as play progessed lined the enclosure. There were changes in both teams from those, which took part in the initial League contest, and a big burst of applause went around the ground as Holt put in an appearance with his old comrades. Prompt to time the teams lined up as follows: - Everton: - Hillman, goal Kelso, and Adams, backs Boyle (captain), Holt, and Stewart, backs, Williams, Bell Flewitt, Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Notts Forest: - Allsopp, goal, Ritchies, and Scott, backs, Stuart (a), McPherson, and Forman (f), halfbacks, Pike, Carnally Kerr, Forman (fr), and McInnes, forwards. The Forest won the toss, and soon, the kick off the Evertonians got clean away, Chadwick missing the net by the mearest shave. Some very effective passing on the part of Cassidy and Pike resulted in Adams services being called into requision, and a moment later Holt came in for a round of applause on twice robbing Kerr and placing his forwards in possession, and them followed some magnificent passing by the whole of the front line, bell putting the ball slightly wide of the upright. The play of the home forwards was now simply brilliant and after Williams, Bell and Chadwick had tried in vain to pillow the ball into the net. Milward met a return from Allsopp which, Chadwick had levelled, and from a difficult position though close in, scored the first goal nine minutes from the start. The restart brought no charge in the general run of the game, the smart tackling of the halves and accurate movements of the forwards being very striking incidents of play. Meanwhile the Forest left put in some capital bit of play. McInnes especially during good work, but being opposed to Boyle at his best, but little headway could be made. Eventually the Forest van lobbed the ball on, and Forman sent in a beautiful shot at Hillman who saved in his accustomed style, and during the next few minutes the Everton defenders had an anxious time, especially so when ‘'hands'' was given against them close in. Williams got the ball away, and after McPherson the Forest centre half, had failed to arrest Flewitt it looked long odds on the Everton centre booking a scored point. He overran the ball in his final effort, but was well attended by Chadwick, who had a clear field, and notched the second point after 23 minutes play. Following this reverse the Foresters played up briskly, and swarmed round Hillman's charge, but again such sterling defenders, as Holt Stewart, and Boyle who repeatedly broke up all attempts at combination, their prospects of scoring were not at any time bright. A long lunge from Stewart, changed venue and Chadwick sent in a swift straight shot, which took effect, and within a minute Stewart all but repeated the performance. Milward and Chadwick broke away cleverly and drawing round then, left the field clear for Flewitt, who took full advantage of the opening efforted him by regulating the fourth goal of the match. The Forest halves were simply powerless against the Everton line, who times after time raced down in very pretty fashion. A couple of corners came to nothing, and the interval arrived with Everton leading by 4 goals to nil.

Immediately on resuming, the Forest forward gave promise of running close quarters, and during the first five minutes they combined with far greater effect than at any period in the first half. F.R.Forman seemed to have the goal at his mercy, but there was no defeating the burly Evertonians who scooped the ball away, and again saved a low shot at the corner. This bombardment finished up the home lot, who got off in an irresistible swing, and on the forwards gathering in the goalmouth, Bell fell back and waited his opportunity, which soon came, with a strong low shot gave Allsopp no chance of saving. Play had scarely been resumed when Williams and Bell raced prettily down, and on the insider putting a timely touch in the direction of Milward the last named player banged the ball past Ritchie and Allsopp into the net. Pulling themselves together the Reds worked the ball nicely down the field, but the final efforts were feeble in the extreme. McInnes had a good opening and shot in strongly, but had the misfortune of seeing the ball rebound from the crossbar, and after Flewitt had attired the enthusiasm of the Everton spectators with a brilliant run down, F.Forman put in a high shot which, Hillman saved at the expense of a fruitless corner. Then followed a period of even play about midfield. When Carnelly and Pike sprinted off, the former scoring the Forest first with a shot that completely beat Hillman. During the next few minutes Holt put in a tremendous amount of work, and eventually gave Bell possession, who fastening on the ball, fairly cut out the pace, and sent in a beauty cross shot, which only required the least touch from Milward, but this was not forthcoming. A few minutes later McInnes lay in good position and shot in strongly, but at the crossbar. The efforts of the visitors were rewarded in the last minute of play, when F.R.Forman put the ball out of Hillman's reach, but had the latter not slipped the point would probably have been easily warded off. Nothing further was done, and Everton won by 6 goals to 2.

 

EVERTON REVIEW

September 9 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Despite the unpromising outlook in the morning on Saturday, when Everton engaged in their second League League encounter the afternoon turned out beautifully fine, and from a spectator's point of view left nothing to be desired. It is quite possible that the players if consulted, might have preferred a little less sun, but on the other hand, the executive of the club must welcome a bright and pleasant afternoon on account of the increased receipts, for although the weather seems to make no different at all to the real football enth8ususm. Yet there are a great number who fell that it is not worth risking the discomfort of a wetting to watch a match in which, the play is considerably deteriorated by a sloppy and slippery ground. At Goodison Park on Saturday a crowd of quite 18,000 followed the game with eagerness and excitement and in addition seemed to be thoroughly enjoying themselves, for their favourites were in one of their best moods. After their very poor display against Sheffield Wednesday on Monday last it was quite refreshing to witness the magnificent passing of the forwards well and judiciously fed by their halves. It is doubtedly to the latter division that the immense improvement in Saturday's play is due, and it leads one at once to think what an extensive difference Holt makes to the team. It seems almost a moral effect he has, for all departments play a vastly improved game. On Saturday Boyle, Holt, and Stewart adopted the tactics pursued by the international halves against Scotland on the Everton ground early in the year, and when as was several times the case, they could not see their way clear to put the ball nicely to their forwards, they passed to one another with the invariable result that the ball, when got rid of was placed at one of the forwards toes, and not as is too often the case, justed kicked aimlessly up the field. The halfback passing game has another great advantage as it draws away the first line of defence in the opposing halfbacks and thus leaves the forwards peer when they do get the ball. The forward line was the same that did duty on Monday, with the exception of Flewitt the Lincoln City recuit, who took Hartley's place in the centre position, and who was an undoubted success. His passing is smart and exact, and he has in addition speed and strength, and with just a little more precision in shooting, he should prove one of the best. Milward and Chadwick were in great form as their old clubmate. Alec Stewart will testify. Williams and Bell completed the quintet these also playing in sterling fashion. Some very pretty bits of triangular passing between them and Boyle were witness. Milwards second goal being the direct result of one of these. The backs Adams and Kelso, were very safe, especially in the first half and Hillman in goal brought off some magnificent saves, so that one may forgive him for letting two shot through which, under ordinary conditions, he would have cleared. In the case of the second goal recored against him he obviously tripped and fell short of the ball. He proved a tower of strength in the term, his judgement in taking the ball right off an opponents from being unerring. Then again, he was so cool when learing, and could not be rushed by the opposing forwards, most of whom looked twice before attempting to charge the big man through his goal. It is a great pleasure to have nothing but congratulations to chronicle for our local team. They played a magnificent game on Saturday and fully deserved their handsome victory of six goals to two. If they could only keep up this form all through the season and is a consummation devoutly to be wished high honours are certainly assured them. Unfortunately accidents, indisposition, and the like chip in at time, and jar the smooth working of every football team and it is to be hoped, that Everton share of these misfortunate will be very light. Milward (2), Chadwick (2), Flewitt, and Bell scored the goals for Everton. There were three changes in the Nottingham team from that which, defeated Bury so decisively on Thursday last, F.R.Forman Kerr (the old Liverpool Forwards) and F.Forman displacing Shaw, Rose, and McCracken respectively. Of the forwards McInnes and F.R.Forman were beyond question the best. Kerr was timid and quite outclassed. F.Forman on the left, was the pick of the halfbacks and this player made a very good show at times in spite of the clever forward wing that he had against him, whilst McPherson and Alec Stewart worked hard, but with little effect. The backs, Ritchie and Scott, were a long time in settling down to their work, and indeed, in the first half they were far from attaining, a high standard, but in the second portion of play they showed up brilliantly on several occasions. The beautiful and well timed passing of the opposing forwards completely mastered them, and Allsopp in goal had a very hard and anxious time, and he not made some really brilliant saves the score against his club would have been much heavier. Towards the end of the second half the Everton men, satisfied with their substantial lead, appeared to be inclined to take things easily, and it was then that Notts succeeded in obtaining their two goals, which were recored by Carnelly and F.R.Forman. It would be well to impress upon Evertonians the importance of keeping an eye on the goal averages, which in this era of keen competition is a very important in the event of a close race for championship of the League. This evening at 5-30 the Bury team, which has had anything but a pleasant experience since their inclusion in the first League rank, will put in an appearance at Goodison Park.

The season opened at Goodison Park on Monday evening last when Sheffield Wednesday furnished the visiting side, and for a midweek match the game was largely patronised. The display of the home team was not up to expectation, and laded during the first half they were simply outclassed by the Blades, whose forwards were ever keen on the ball and withal effective when anywhere within range of goal. Crawshaw the Wednesday half, was most successful in breaking up whatever attempts at combination the Evertonians indulged in and on the left Jamieson was most assiduous in his attentions to those in front of him. The full backs had plenty of resource, and on the whole the Blackburn were voted to have a finely balanced team which, should carry then successfully through their engagements. Through the Everton team falled in the first portion they somewhat made amends in the second; but it was a case of touch, and go with then, and their supporters heavily a sigh of relief when their men drew up level. The absence of Holt had perhaps much to do with the lack of combination, which was apparent throughout the proceeding; but at the same time the side was not favoued with anthing like the amount of lack that came in the way of the visitors.

 

EVERTON V BURY

September 10, 1895. Birmingham Daily Post

At Liverpool, before 6,000 spectators, the weather being brilliantly fine. Bury kicked off against the sun, and had the worst of the play. Bell opened the scoring for Everton, points followed from Chadwick and Milward. The home side pressed repeatedly, and the Bury goal had narrow escapes. The visitors spurted down once or twice, and Plant scored, Wyllie getting a second. Half-time; Everton 3, Bury 2. Upon resuming both goals were attacked and had narrow escapes, Bell missing a couple of chances when close in. Play was lively, both sides doing their utmost to score. Hillman got a nasty kick on the head and play was suspended for a few minutes. After this Everton pressed, but were repulsed by the Bury backs, who showed sterling defence. Result Everton 3, Bury 2.

 

EVERTON 3 BURY 2 (game 185)

September 10 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The first visit of the Bury team as full-blown first Leaguers did not arouse too much enthusiasm as was expected and the aggregate of the crowd numbered about 8,000. The teams were: - Everton: - Hillman, goal, Kelso, and Adams backs Goldie Boyle (captain), and Stewart, halfbacks, Williams, Bell, Fleapit, Chadwick, and Milward, forwards. Bury: - Montgomery, goal, Davidson, and Davies, backs, Pray, Clegg, and Ross, halfbacks, Wylie, Moonie, Barbour, Henderson, and Plant, forwards. Mr. Kirkham, Darwen referee. Everton won the toss and taking advantage of the wind and sun were the first to show up, Flewitt almost getting through in the first few minutes. A foul to Bury gave temporary relief, and Plant and Henderson ran down, Hillman having to handle smartly to effort a clearance. Moonie and Wylie got in some pretty effective passes on the Bury right, but they failed to make any impression on the home defence, and on Adams finally clearing Flewitt and Bell combined nicely, with the result the latter player sent in a stinging shot, which found its way into the net after striking the under portion of the crossbar. Play had no sooner been resumed then the ball was again worked down to the Bury quarters and Chadwick sent in a slow shot at Montgomery, who slipped, and no, 2 goal was registered. Except for an occasional burst by Plant and Henderson whose pass was high over the bar by Moonie the Everton team were in complete possession of the game, and after 20 minutes Milward ran in and converted a rattling good pass by Williams into the third point. Shots all too high were levelled by Bell, Chadwick, and Goldie, after which Kelso was beset by his opponents, but Adams came to the rescue, and cleared easily. Milward took up the running and drove hard in when near goal, but Davidson charged his shot down, as his partner did also to another directly following from Williams. Dilatory play by the Bury forwards let in Everton again, and play was exceedingly tame for some time the Bury backs miskicking on several occasions. At length Wylie got past Stewart but upon being faced by Adams kicked wildly over the bar. Nothing of any racement followed. Beynold some tall kicking till the visiting right again got to work and Wylie although sandwiched by Adams and Stewart passed forward to Moonie, who drove in splendid style, bringing out Hillman with a magnificent effort, who conceded a corner. From this point Wylie placed in so accurately that Plant easily defeated Hillman after clearing with a good shot close in. during the next few minutes the Bury forwards, taking advantage of some rather loose play on the part of the Everton defenders, often came within reach of Hillman, and eventually Wylie, who was palpably offside, put the ball into the net, and to the great astonishment of the spectators and players alike, the referee allowed the goal. The second reverse fairly aroused the Evertonians, who swarmed round Montgomery's charge and shots were rained in thick and fast, but the Custodian was at this juncture full of resource, and cleared admirably. A few minutes later the whistle announced the interval, when the scored stood- Everton, 3 goals, Bury 2. The second half opened woth the Everton forwards in possession, and Williams sent in a shot which, however, lacked fire. Bell followed with a couple of attempts, the result of fine passing by his partner but both went wide, following which Barbour out in some timely touches to Plant, who completely defeated Kelso, and sent in a grand cross shot, which glided past the bar, and again after Moonie and wylie had worked the ball down the left, Henderson shot in, but this with no better result. At length Williams appealed to have a fine opening, but Davidson chipped in neatly, and a moment later Chadwick had the disappointment of seeing one of his noted screw shot just missing the net by inches. From an Everton point of view play livened up considerably, and for some time the ball was kept bobbing about the Bury defence, but both Davidson and Davies met all efforts to score with good injudgement. From a breakaway by the centre Wylie got possession, and sent in a magnificent shot, which just grazed the crossbar. The same player followed with another, and Hillman, in falling forward to save, was met by Plant, who was rushing across, and received a nasty kick on the head, which caused some little delay in the proceedings. Getting to work again, Bury had just slightly the lead in movements, mainly through weakness of the left half, who was often out his place, a defeat which the Bury left were not slow to take advantage of however, by some sterling play on the part of Boyle and Stewart, danger was often averted, though several times it was found expedient to drive back to Hillman when hard pressed. Chadwick and Milward at length got off, and the former sent in a hot shot, which rebounded from the crossbar, and within the next few minutes the same player followed with a couple, but there was no defeating the Bury backs, who defended their charge magnificently. Getting away again, a couple of corners fell to Bury, but nothing came of them. At this juncture Milward fell back to strengthen the defence, and play which, all through the second half was not at the greatness character, took a most vigorous turn, not unmixed with a sprinkling rough methods. Nothing further was scored, and Everton won by 3 goals to 2.

 

TRANMERE ROVERS RESERVES 1 EVERTON RESERVES 2

September 10 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

These clubs opposed each other in friendly rivalry at Tranmere last evening, before fully 2,000 spectators. Jeffs kicked off uphill, for the Rovers, who made headway up the right wing McKinley and Rendall being especially prominent. McKinley tested Cook with a fine shot, but Parry and McDonald eventually relieved the pressure. Everton attacked in turn McInnes Reay, and Murray, by a sequence of pretty passing, got within shooting distance of Baxter and after Spencer had effected a clearance Hill got hold and defeated Baxter. Jeffs Rendall and McKinlay were cheered for grand play up the centre and right wing and Jeff experienced very hard line with a shot, which went over the crossbar off Parry's head. Halftime-Everton 1 goal, Tranmere Rovers nil. On charging ends the Rovers playing down hill, created a most favorable impression, by the combined attack on the Everton goal, which for a time proved impenetrable, so well was it defended by Elliott McDonald, and Parry. Lawrence and Hilton put in some clever work, and once Hilton met a lovely centre from Rendell, which Cook however saved. Still crowding around the Everton goal, the Rovers made matters extremely warm for the visitor's defence. McKinley sent in a shot which Parry charged down, but Douglas (who was lying well down the field) passed to Jeffs, who equalised the game with a beautiful shot, which passed into the net just under the crossbar quite out of Cook's reach. McInnes changed places with Hill which resulted in Everton adding another goal McInnes received a centre from Hill and tested Baxter, who cleared temporarily but McInnes met the ball once more and placed the issue beyond doubt. A couple of free kicks and a abortive corner afterwards gave Everton a chance to increase their score, but Price Spencer, and Davidson were in champion form for the Rovers, and repelled quite a number of dangerous shots. Result Everton 2 goals Tranmere Rovers 1 goal. Teams- Everton: - Cook, goal, Parry, and McDonald, backs, Elliott, Melklejohn, and Jones, halfbacks, Reay, McInnes, Hill, Murray, and Scholfield, forwards, Tranmere Rovers: - Baxter, goal, Spencer (w), and Price, backs, Davidson, Douglas, and Anderson, halfbacks, McKinley, Rendell, Jeffs, Lawrence, and Hilton, forwards.

 

BOLTON WANDERERS 3 EVERTON 1 (game 186)

September 16 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Bolton Wanderers open their new ground, Burnden Park

The Everton team visited Bolton on Saturday the occasion being the opening of the Wanderers new ground at Burden Park. A large following of Evertonians travelled by execursion trains from Exchanged Station and for some considerable time before the commencement of the proceedings the ground and its appointments, which were greatly admired, were the topics of general conversation. The Wanderers executive are to be congratulated on the result of their work, for excellent provision for both standing and sitting accommodation has been made, and when the work is completed they will posses one of the finest grounds in the country. An additional attraction in the shape of a cycle contest, which commenced an hour before the match, served to while away, the time, and at four o'clock, when the teams faced, there would be quite 12,000 spectators present. The teams were as follows: - Wanderers: - Sutcliffe, goal, Somerville and Jones, backs, Paton McGeachan, and Fairbairn halfbacks, Martin, Brown Joyce, Wright, and Cassidy, forwards: - Everton: - Hillman, goal, Kelso, and Adams backs, Boyle (captain), Holt, and Stewart halfbacks, Bell McInnes Fewitt, Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Mr. John Lewis referee. Everton won the toss and Joyce opened the play on behalf of the Wanderers. The game began somewhat tamely, and following some neat work on the part of Stewart, Milward and Chadwick fastened on the ball, and on Somerville coming to the rescue of his side, the sphere was sent over to Bell, who shot grandly in to Sutcliffe, but without effect. A free kick to the Wanderers brought about a charge of venue, but Holt stood in the way of further progess; and Flewitt made off, only to be robbed by Somerville, who put in a hugh punt up the field, and eventually Wright and Cassidy forced the play on the Wanderers left, a moment which, culminated by Martin shooting in at Hillman, who was penalised for running at the ball, but the Wanderers lost headway, as Freebairn shot badly to the net. From a free kick, taken by Boyle at halfway, the ball glided off Flewitt's head to Sutcliffe who was lucky in reaching it, and then McInnes was twice penalised, which resulted in relief of the Wanderers goal. Returning again Boyle just missed scoring from a beautifully taken corner kick, and immediately afterwards the ball was lobbed to the other end, where Hillman's resource were ably tested by Wright, Cassidy and Brown. A severe pressure was kept up, and eventually Martin lifted the ball over the bar. Again the play swerved to the other end, and Milward only missed the mark by inches. Following some sterling halfback play, the home forwards got fairly under way, but Kelso defended superbly, and often kicked and headed the ball out with good judgement. At this juncture Holt and Wright made for the ball the former to head it and the latter to kick it. Holt headed the ball away, but in doing so also came in contact with Wright's foot, and as the accident was at the time serious he had to retire from the field, this misfortune happening after 23 minutes play. Milward went centre half, and at once the Wanderers pressed severely. Cassidy shot in, and as Hillman only partially saved Martin rushed the ball into the net 25 minutes from the commencement. Free kicks now became frequent, and the general play resulted in heavily pressure on Hillman's charge. In close Flewitt called upon Sutcliffe, but the effort was rather weak, and again McInnes had an easy chance to equalise, but his effort was also tame. A long kick by Jones completely changed the scene, and the home forwards swarmed down on the Everton defenders. Brown at length round Adams and drove the ball across to Cassidy who ably met it and called upon Hillman. The custodian attempted to tip the ball over the bar, but it race straight and from the scrimmage it was rushed into the net for the second time. A magnificent run down by Brown was the next item, and then Chadwick raised the hopes of the Everton crowd on having command in an easy position, but he had the misfortune to see his attempt charged down a similar experienced awaiting a further effort, a few minutes later. Bell next tried his luck, and just grazed the post, and then Joyce made off until Adams brought him up as he was steadying for a shot and assisted by Kelso, the Everton van again got into a good swing. Somerville missed the kick and Chadwick appeared to have a certain goal at his command when Jones crossed over and robbed him beautifully. From a subsequently goal kick Bell fastened on the ball, and passing smartly to McInnes the latter shot in at the corner, giving Sutcliffe no chance to clear. Halftime now arrived with the wanderers leading by 2 goals to 1. On resuming Holt rejoined his comrades, and getting to work the Evertonians were the first to assert themselves. Milward all but put the ball through at the corner, and from the goalkick Mcinnes followed suit, after Bell had completely beaten Jones. A foul charge in goal relieved Sutcliffe, but for some time the Everton forwards had the upper hand, but could not break through the defence of Somerville and Jones. Then Hillman had a warm time as Cassidy and Martin levelled clever shots, and frequently scrimmaging took place in the twelve yard's line. Brown shot high over the bar, and then Flewitt was in grand position, but was ruled offside, and by a series of long kicks the ball was once again bobbling round Hillman's charge. The goalkeeper brought off a magnificent save from Joyce after Cassidy had worked the ball down. Eventually Wright screwed across from the corner, and Joyce headed in with capital judgement. The later stages were until the last minutes fairly even, and as nothing further was scored, the Wanderers won a fair game by 3 goals to 1.

 

EVERTON RESERVES 6 LEEK 0

September 16 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

These teams met at Goodison Park on Saturday for a Combination match, before a fair number of spectators. The home team tried several new players Jones (Wrexham) Hues (Oswestry), and Scholfield (aintree Church) being given a trail. The names of the teams were as follows: - Everton: - Hues goal, McDonald and Storrier backs, Jones Melklejohn, and Elliott halfbacks, Reay, Murray Mainman, Hill, and Schofield forwards. Leek: - Critchlow goal, Low, and Cantral, backs Birch, Hudson, and Bratt, halfbacks, Keats, Lowe, Pratt, Bell, and Swinson, forwards. Right from the kick off Everton were much superior all round, but general defensive tactics by the Leeks team kept Everton at bay for some time and Half time arrived with Everton leading, but one goal to nil. On resuming however, they grandly put a different complexion in the proceedings, and as the result of excellent forward play, ran out easy winners by 6 goals to nil.

 

EVERTON REVIEW

September 16 1895. The Liverpool mercury

Everton fell victim to Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. The two scored by the Wanderers in the first half were samples of the luck; the long kicking across the field of play though neither interesting nor scientific was at the same time full of exciting moments. As for fastance when Everton defence was completely non plussed the ball reached Hillman in the mouth of goal, who attempted to save and partially did so, but owing to the Wanderers charging with keen judgement, Hillman efforts was frustrated, and the ball was forced into the net. Similar circumstances and fate attending the second downfall of the Everton citadel. Both of these goals may be considered were lucky for had Hillman only had a moment's more time each would probably have been saved. After this second disaster the visitors seemed best upon taking revenge, and although numerically handicapped they set to with a will, and in evidence of the same after some very, smart play, combined with pretty passing they managed to decrease their opponents lead. After the interval Holt, reappeared, but seemed to be thoroughly upset by his accident, and was of very little use; in fact it would have been more to Everton advantage had to he not rejoined his comrades, as he had by no means recovered from the shock. Both teams were now working practically on the same lines as far as style of play was concerned, but not once during the second portion did the Evertonians look like a winning team and a third goal which resulted from one of the smartest bits of play in the match was recored against them the Wanderers thus emerging by three goals to one. Sutcliffe in goal was as effective as ever, both in resource at critical moments and in kicking and in Somerville and Jones the club had most able defenders. The halfbacks line was a well balanced out. Paton's burly form was often in evidence, and McGeechan, in the centre, was responsible for many fine touches, which gave those in front excellent openings while Fairbairns, on the left was mainly prominent by the close attention to Bell, to whom he struck like a leach throughout the whole game. The forwards worked out their style of play to a nicely. Martin who displaced Tannahill on the outside right, created a favourable impression, and Brown, Wright, and Cassidy had plenty of openings from Joyce, who was a very capable centre. The Everton forwards were somewhat erractic, and much of their disconfidence must be attributed to scant support from the halfbacks line. While Bell and Mcinnes had plenty of work to do, Chadwick and Milward were practically left to make their own play, and especially was this the case in the second portion of the game. Flewitt was not a success in the centre, and Mcinnes did not shine in his position, and we may excpect to find the front rank differently constituted in the next League encounter. Stewart worked hard throughout, and put in some finished work against Martin and Brown who were at their best, and on the other wing Boyle often checked Wright and Cassidy, and put Bell in possession, but there were occasions when it would have been more profitable to have stung the ball over to the left. Adams was often hard pressed, and did his work well, while Kelso played with excellent tact and judgement. Hillman was in good form, and it was his misfortunate not fault, that the score was so pronounced.

 

EVERTON 0 BLACKBURN ROVERS 2 (game 187)

SEPTEMBER 23 1895. THE Liverpool Mercury

Beautifully fine weather, tempered by an invigorating breeze, favoured the first of the League fixtures between Everton, and the Rovers at Goodison Park, as Saturday last, and as the visitors are always great favourites with Liverpool generally it was in keeping with old traditions that the ground should be well patronised. There were some 18,000 spectators present at the commencement of the game, and the numbers increased as the play progressed. Rovers had a special course of training for the event, and were represented by the strongest available team that the executive could command. While on the other hand further changes were made in the home ranks. Flewitt stood down for Hartley, and Williams who has recovered from his injury, again took his position on the outside right. There was some doubt as to weather Hillman would be at his post as he received a kick in the Bolton Wanderers match which left him rather lame, but he turned out all right, and at four o'clock the teams lined up as follows : - Everton: - Hillman, goal, Kelso, and Adams, backs, Boyle (captain), Holt, and Stewart, halfbacks, Williams, Bell, Hartley, Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Blackburn Rovers: - Ogilvie goal, Brandon and Murray, backs, Dewar, Anderson, and Cleghorn, halfbacks, Haydock, Whitehead, Turnbull, Killean, and Chippendale, forwards. The Rovers lost the toss, and on Turnbull putting the ball in motion Killean and Chippendale at once got off and the latter swinging the ball across Whitehead shot in gradually, but had the misfortune to see the ball rebound from the Crossbar. The early attack, which resulted from most accurate movements, on the part of the forwards, at once proved that the Evertonians had a severe task on hand, especially so when a couple of minutes later Turnbull just failed to score by a few inches. Adams effected a slight relief, but no impression could be made upon the Rovers halfbacks line, and the left wing once again led on the attack. Kelso was penalised, and Turnbull did not take what appeared a fairly good chance. Eventually the home forwards were in possession, and the ball travelled across in short stages from Williams to Milward. Dewar was beaten, but there was no getting round Brandon, who covered his custodian most cleverly. Some tricky though not effective work by Haydock was the next item, and after Whitehead had failed to take up the running Stewart drove the ball on to Hartley who was unfortunately rulled offside. Meanwhile Dewar, Anderson, and Cleghorn had been doing excellent work, and took full advantage of the shortcoming of the Everton van. A free kick against the home side resulted in a long shot at Hillman who cleared well, but Anderson met the return, and with a well judged hard drive piloted the ball into the net after the game had been in progess but six minutes. Getting to work again, Hartley tested Ogilvie, but the shot lacked string, and following the clearance Cleghorn all but scored from a free kick against Bell. Kelso was doing good work, and a smart bit of play by Holt changed the venue to Ogilvie's charge and here Chadwick made a capital attempt to head the ball into the net. Then followed some pretty and effective play by Haydock and whitehead, between whom there was a perfect understanding, but in the final stage the latter was ruled offside. At length Stewart made an opening for Milward, who banged the ball in at a terrictic tae; but it happened to be drive straight at the goalkeeper, who cleaned, and then Brandon conceded a fruitless corner. At the other end Killean tested Hillman, who fisted out strongly, following which, Hartley, though surrounded by opponents, brought off a magnificent shot, which however, passed slightly wide of the post. During the next few minutes the Everton forwards had several openings, and the ball was put anywhere but between the uprights. A long pressure followed on the Rovers goal, which was brought to an end on Holt lifting the ball over the bar. Turnbull created quite a diversion in the centre, and eventually put Haydock in possession, who could certainly have scored, but for the close attentions of Adams, who, after, being beaten. Smartly recovered himself. A few minutes later every, one was expecting Chadwick to equalised as a good opening presented itself; but like the others he was a long way out of his reckoning, as the ball sailed high over the bar. On the right, Williams put in grand shot, which Brandon only partially met, and had the left been, well up a goal must have been scored. The interval was announced shortly afterwards, the Rovers leading by one goal to none. Everton got well away after the change of ends and Hartley had a shot at goal which, was just a trifle wide. Bell and Williams who were closely attended to by Murray, put in a lot of work, but so keen were the Rovers defenders in being on the man about to shoot that the final attempts appeared to be very amateurish. At last Chippendale got round Boyle and centred to Turnbull and as Kelso only partially checked the movement. Whitehead cleverly met the ball and drove it hard into the net. Hillman having no chance whatever with it. This second reverse happened ten minutes after the restart, and the ball had no sooner been put into play again than the diminutive inside right almost brought another disaster to Everton as he headed the ball slightly wide of the net. Following some sterling play by Stewart the home forwards got into their old stride, and was frequently dangerous. Hartley sent in a fine shot across the goal, which Williams only justed missed meeting, and in the next minutes Chadwick met with no better luck after getting round Brandon. Some little delay was caused owing to Holt and Killean coming into collision, and on getting to work again Hillman, who had ran out to have was fortunate in not being defeated for a third time as Chippendale had the goal, at his mercy, but shot terribly wide. After a fruitless attempt to get round, Murray and Brandon Turnbull gathered his line together and a very pretty movement brought the play to the Everton goal, where Kelso Adams and Hillman had a most anxious time. Some brilliant saves were effected, and it was not until Stewart had outwitted Haydock and whitehead, after both had been revailing shots, that the pressure was relieved. There was no further scoring though the remaining play was favorable to the Rovers, and Everton received their first defeat at home by 2 goals to nil.

 

MACCLESFIELD 2 EVERTON RESERVES 2

September 23 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Played at Macclesfield on Saturday. The visitors favoured by the elements, and though the ran on fairly even lines they scored before change of ends. After the interval the play a totally different turn, as the home side play up level, and afterwards took the lead, but on the Evertonians equalising, and the remained a draw of 2 goals each. The Everton combination found the Macclesfield team in first rate condition at home, and though they took the lead in the early portion of the play by a goal from Scholfield, and were somewhat fortunate in ultimately gaining a point.

Played 3 won 2, lost 0 draw 1, for 11 against 4 points 5

 

EVERTON REVIEW

September 23 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Beautiful summer weather favoured Everton first meeting with the Blackburn Rovers on Saturday, and the games between these teams are always of an attractive description there was an exceptionally big crowd present at the commencement of the proceedings. The field had been very carefully prepared, and presented a perfect appearance the grass, which, in previous games was much too long and impeded the players having been cut and well rolled. From the kick off Blackburn Rovers were quickly down at the Everton goal and it early became evident that they meant to make matters for the home team. Their efforts were soon rewarded, for about six minutes from the start Hillman ran out to clear a shot, and before he could get back to his charge Anderson the Rovers centre half sent in a long hard drive, which took effect. Encouraged by this early success, the visitors played a magnificent game, but did not increase their lead up to halftime. After the interval, the team set to work in earnest fashion, but the Rovers excelled in the nicer points of play, and invariably had the best of the exchanges. By means of some smart play on the part of Chippendale, Turnbull and whitehead, the last named scored with a remarkably fine shot, which completely defeated Hillman, and indeed it is questionable if any custodian under similar conditions could have saved his charge. From the point up to the close of the game the Rovers held the upper hand, although there were occasions when the home team broke away, and appeared dangerous but they were met by such a superb defence that their onslaught brought little or no success, and when the whistle sounded they retired beaten by two goals to nil. It is a long time since Everton have been beaten pointless on their own ground and it was very unfortunate for them that they should meet the Rovers in such tip top form before they have properly got into their stride. The play of the home team on the whole was only fair, the back division, if anything being the weakest. This deficiency necessitated the halfback line paying especial attention to the defensive tactics, and they were consequently unable to aid their side as much as usual attacking. The forwards when they obtained possession put in some very fine touches of passing at times, but they were seldom properly backed up, and consequently could make out little impression on the stern defence that met them. Chadwick was not up to the standard of play, and was robbed of the ball a great deal often than usual. Hartley played a good game individually, but did not keep his wings well together and, as individually at the expense of combination cannot be depended upon to win matches, this point must command attention. The outside men, Milward and Williams were perhaps the best of the forwards, though the latter's shooting was erratic. The halfbacks put in a lot of work, and at times were very effective, but Holt is not yet in conditions, and a fast game like that of Saturday told more than a trifle on him. The backs were as already stated rather weak, for their kicking was neither strong nor clean, and they were not smart enough when the Rovers got within shooting range to prevent them getting in their shots. Hillman brought off many fine saves, but he was very lame, and it is no doubt due to this that the first goal was scored, as he was unable to get back to his charge quickly enough. The team were also on this account deprived of the benefit of his hugh kicks, which when the defence is pressed, are often of such sterling value. Too high praise cannot be bestowed on the Rovers, for the fine display. They were in better condition, more resourceful, and withal more accurate man to man than their opponents and the special training that they had undergone last week for this particular match has thus served them well. Their forwards were very smart and tricky, and a special word is due to Turnbull, the centre, for the very capable way in which, he kept his wings employed. In their onslaught on the Everton goal they were always dangerous and they had the satisfaction of knowing that a thoroughly efficient trio of halfbacks backed them up. The full backs Brandon and Murray, played a strong, and safe game, and very rarely indeed did they allow the home forwards to get within dangerous shooting distance. Ogilvie the goalkeeper, had a very little to do but when he was called upon there was no lack of resource displayed. The result of the game came as a big disappointing to Everton's supporters, for they are not accustomed to see their team worsted at all points of play, but if the wish to see their team come out successfully was not realised, they had the satisfaction of witnessing high class football that has really, if ever been excelled.

 

GLASGOW RANGERS 3 EVERTON 1

September 27 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The Everton team paid their usual visit to Ibrox Park, Glasgow, yesterday, the great holiday in Glasgow. The team travelled overnight to their destination, and had a short drive round previous to the match taking place. So as the fixture should not dash with Celtic and Sunderland, the kick off was timed for the unusual hour of half past twelve. The weather was of a more charming characters, but being midday and in spite of a rather nice breeze the astmoshere was much too warm for football. The Everton team were the first appear, and the sides lined up in the followings order: - Everton: - Hillman, goal, McDonald, and Storrier, backs, Stewart, Meiklejohn, and Boyle (captain), halfbacks, Latta, Mcinnes, Hartley, Flewitt, and Milward, forwards, Glasgow Rangers: - Yulle, goals, Drummend, (captain) and Crawford, half, Marshall, Burns, and Gibson, halfbacks, Boyd, Muir, McEwan, McCreadie, and Stewart, halfbaccks, forwards. Drummond won the toss, and of course took advantage of the wind, which was blowing from goal to goal; but owing to the nonappearance of two of the home team a considerable delay occurred. Upon Hartley starting, Boyd and Muir ran down the ball, and Hillman was compelled to run out to save. Directly following Stewart put in a long centre, which however, went astray. After this Everton came away with some capital forward work, and both Hartley and Flewitt had nice opportunities of scoring, but failed to do so. A hugh kick by Storrier put Everton again in possession, and after Latta, and McInne had carried the play well into the ememy's quarters the famous right winger sent wide of the desired direction. A foul off Stewart, was next item, rather close into the visitors goalmouth, but nothing came of it, and upon Flewitt, Hartley, and McInnes attempting to break away Burns put in a lot of grand work, both with his head and feet, and deservedly cheered. The Bulk of the play was confirmed to oneside of the field, the heavy kicking of Drummond and Crawford allowing to breeze to have great effect upon the leather, while the general play at the period was not of a very exciting nature. A brilliant rush by Hartley, who received from Storrier, earned a corner, but the ball was put in just a shade too high for the Everton middleman to reach it. Offside was effectual called against McEwan, who led up stinging attacks upon Hillman's charge, and after two corners kicks had fallen to the share of the Rangers. Burns removed all immediate danger by misdirecting wide of the goal. Following an attack by the visitors, McDonald let Boyd and Muir in, but without result. For a spell Everton had to act entirely on the defensive, Marshall, Burns, and Gibson (the Rangers halves) being in magnificent form, and as the wind up of a pretty sequence of passes by Stewart and McCreadidy the latter shot hard at Hillman, at short range, but the Evertonian dealt with the effort in capital style, as he did with several others which, rained in upon him in rapid succession from McEwan, Boyd, and Stewart. Weak passing by Flewitt spoiled a combined forward movement and upon half time being called the score sheet had not been requisitioned. Upon resuming after a lengthily interval, the Everton forwards shaped in much improved style, and first Latta and then Hartley made two splendid attempts, following up by Latta beaten Yullie the next moment. Everton now had slightly the better of the argument, and Hartley, when given a beautiful opening, drove high over the bar, at length Rangers forwards well supported by their halves, formulated a strong attack upon Hillman, and a Penalty kick was awarded against one of the Everton defence for tripping McEwan and Gibson scored at the second attempt. Clever work by Latta and McInnes as though another point for Everton was likely to secure but Crawford and Drummond defended gallantly, and Yulle was lucky in clearing. At last the rather monotonous character of the play became changed, and Muir introduced greater vigour and variety, with the result that McCreadie added a second point after Hillman had fisted out an attempt. In a trice an exhibitions of had judgements by McDonald deceived the Everton custodian and McEwan notched the third point, a simple affair altogether. The remaining stages of the game were distinctly in favour of Everton, who marred the performance by wretched shooting, whilst glaring infringement of the offside rule by the homesters were allowed to go unnoticed by the referee. Result Glasgow Rangers 3 goals Everton 1.

 

WOLVERHAMPTON WANDERERS 2 EVERTON 3 (game 188)

September 30 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The Everton team journeyed to Wolverhampton on Saturday to engage with the Wolves in the initial League fixture of the season. the day was gloriously fine, and as a good exposition of the game has always been the rule when Everton have visited the Wanderers, there was a capital attendance on the Molineux Ground long before the time for commencing play. When the season faced as follows there would be quite 12,000 spectators present: - Everton: - Hillman, goal, Parry and Adams, backs, Boyle (captain), Holt, and Stewart, halfbacks, Williams, mCinnes, Hartley, Cgadwick, and Milward, forwards. Wanderers: - Rose, goal, Baugh, and Dunn, backs, Nurse, Malpass and Owen halfbacks Wykes, Hendersson, Beats, Wood, and griffins, forwards . Everton won the toss, and on Betts setting the ball in motion, Chadwick at once made the running for Milward, and following a couple of hugh throwns from the touch line by Stewart, a raid was made on the Wolves defences when Baugh and Nurse put in a lot of work. Henderson eventually racing off, and being only pulled up by Parry when dangerous near goal. Holt had the better of beats in a race for possession, and placing the ball nicely to Hartley the latter rushed between Baugh and Malpass Williams racing to the centre with a clear course in front put he unfortunately kicked high over the bar. Again Beats led on his men and patted nicely to Wykes who in turn passed to Henderson, and Hillman was tested with a fairly hot shot, but fisted away all right, and minute later the ball was bobbing about Rose's charge. Baugh defended well, and after Nurse had put his wing in possession the whole of the Wolves line put in some grand passing touches that fairly pulverlised the Everton defendce. Following one of these raids Wood fastened on the ball and banged it into the net after nine minutes play. Getting to work again the home forwards ably fed by their halves again swarmed round Hillman's charge. A long punt Parry cleared the danger, and McInnes and Williams took up the running, only to be confronted by Dunn, who was ever ready, when danger threatened. A little later Stewart placed the ball nicely to Hartley, who in turn sent onto the right, and it was only by a matter of inches that the home goalkeeper was not defeated. After a smart spurt by Beats, Henderson, was penalised, and on Parry taking the kick, the ball was driven accurately towards the net, and after bobbling about for some seconds Baugh put an end to the progess by a hugh kick, which transferred the play to the other end. A pretty bit of combination between Hartley, Chadwick and Milward resulted in the last named swinging the ball across to McInnes who put it wide. Wolverhampton had a goal disallowed for off side, however a minute later Wyles had the Everton goal at his mercy, but made a very poor attempt and after Beats had also finished badly the same player got clean away from the goalkick, and defeated Hillman with a terrific shot. Nothing further was done up to the charge of ends, when Everton were two goals in arrear. Immediately on restarting there was a noticeable alteration in the method of the visitors. Having had a surfeit of short passing in the first half, which was not attended with success, they adopted the swinging across from wing to wing style of play, and, generally speaking they had much the better of their opponents in the coming play. Milward and Chadwick were very often effective in their play and after the latter had sent in a stringing shot, which Dunn headed out Milward fastened on the ball and sent in a stringing cross shot which, took effect eight minutes after the restart. This success fairly encourage the Evertonians, who infused such grit into their play that they appeared certain whenas, and when after the Wolves had visited and found Hillman in good settle, they came again and scored by McInnes from a free kick well placed by Parry, there appeared to be only one team in it. Baugh, Nurse, Beats, and wood worked hard to Check the disaster that had set in, and when there were prospects of a drawn game looming, Chadwick tried his luck, and but for the smart work or Rose in getting up to the corner it would undoubtedly have taken effect. However, the save was but a partial one, and as Hartley was on the look out for an opening he found his opportunity and headed the ball into the net, thus giving his side the lead. The Wolves now played up with frantic determination, and were often within an ace of equalising. Towards the finish Griffin put the ball into the net, but was ruled offside, and as nothing further was done Everton won a hard uphill game by 3 goals to 2.

 

EVERTON RESERVES 8 WREXHAM 0

September 30 1895. The Liverpool mercury

This combination match took place at Goodison Park, before a good crowd. Everton were powerfully represented, Everton winning at easy game by 8 goals to nil. Flewiit (3), Chadwick (2), Hill, Scholfield scoring for Everton . Everton: - Hiles, goals, McDonald, and Storrier, backs, Goldie, Meiklejohn, and Elliott, halfbacks, Reay, Hill, Chadwick (j), Hewitt and Scholfield, forwards.

 

EVERTON REVIEW

September 30 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The scottish journay to Glasgow was not as successful at the Everton well wishes, would have liked it to be with the idea of giving a trial to scene of the younger blood, practically half a reserve team pitted, against the Rangers, who, singularly to state, also adopted the same fashion but the experiment; did not turn out anything like the success saticapted. McDonald opened well, but failed at the pinch. Storrier proved very adept at stopping the men and clearing the ball, but thew manner in which, it was performed does not recommend itself to a connessssant. Meiklejohn in the centre was never bad, and at the same time never brilliant. He is a plodder pure and simply. Flewitt was perhaps the poorest of the forwards, bit his judgements and conditions being at fault. Milward and he did not combine at all, so that the bulk of the work was upon Hartley, McInnes and Latta. Perhaps the feature of the play was the wretched and terribly aggravating shooting form of the visitors. As a matter of fact they had more chances than the home team, some of which were right under the bar, but shoot the leather into the net they could not. The play altogether, no doubt swing to the conditions under which it was played (midday), was of the as you please character and therefore very uninteresting. Several of the Rangers recruits especially the halves show good form and capacities.

The Everton team by their truly magnificent victory over Wolverhampton Wanderers on Saturday last have fully restored a confidence among their supporters which, it must be confessed had been of late on the wane and those pessimistic jeremiads who have been releasing the fortunate of the Blues to the lowest in the League tournament must have received a rude shook when the news reached them on Saturday evening. The choice of team was a difficult task for the executive to enter upon and when the services of such men as Kelso and Bell had to be dispensed with the situation to an ordinary observer it must be confessed, was not a particular brought one, especially as the team had to cope with opponents who have had been the course of several fluctuations in the fortune of the game that have happened in quarters where least experted. As an evidence of the support that is accordingly a winning team, the Molyneux ground was well patronished long before the advertised commencement of operations and at the kick off there would be quite 12,000 spectators round the well appointioned enclosure. The Wolves were very strongly represented, and the way they set about their work was sufficient quarantee to inspire confidence in even the most lukewarm supporter of the club. The Wolves forwards went about their work in the old North End style, and when they once got under weigh it was no light task to put the check upon them. The wings were kept employed, and it can safely be stated that twice out of three times they were in possession, and moreover dangerous. On the other hand, the Everton forwards were also adopting similar short passing tactics with but only a medium of Success, for had it been the sole task of the Wolves halves to lay close up, and hang like leeches to the Everton van, disparaging altogether the fact of their paying ant attention to their front line, they could not have preformed their mission to a greater degree of nicety. The game had been ten minutes in progess when the Everton custodian was defeated by Woods after a heavy fusillade on his charge; but the shot was so well judged and moreover along the ground at such extraordinary speed, that it is highly improbable that any goalkeeper could have attended to it successfully. This point gave the Wolves additional confidence, and they for the next quarter of an hour, simply swarmed round the Everton defenders, who were, however, alive to all executions, and it was only by consummate tact and skill that they kept their opponents from scoring on more than one occasion. After some very clever saves by Hillman a real beauty by the Wolves centre, and the chance of Everton at the interval were gloomy in the extreme. It was patent to any keen observer that the Wolves were quite capable, and well ashooled in the Everton style of attack, and if there was to be any possible chance of the Evertonians averting defeat it must result from a complete change of method. The situation was thoroughly grasped by the Everton skipper, and his confreres, and instead of the short passing, with opposing halfbacks literally lying on top of them, as was the case in the first half, they adopted long passing tactics, which resulted in drawing away both the first and second line of defence and eventually in gaining the victory. The success of Everton accured simply from a matter of generalship superior to that of the Wolves, and Saturday's display proved conclusively that the team although at one period of the game almost hopelessly beaten, which can change it tactics to the perplexity of its opponents will invariably come out strongly at the finish. It was quite refreshing to see the old time methods once again brought into play, and the three goals which, gave Everton the victory were like those against Hillman, altogether out of the reach of the custodian. Milward was the first to score, and it is questionable whether he ever piloted a ball more skillfully out of a goalkeeper's reach, although at a fair distance, and handicapped by an injured foot, McInnes obtained the second under the most unlooked conditions. There were two outside chance for scoring when he got possession close to the goalmouth, i.e, either to trust to driving the ball between a host of legs into the net or to attempt to tip the ball over the heads of halves and backs who defty blocked the goal. He chose the latter course, and it glided from the under portion of the crossbar into the rigging. Towards the close Chadwick had a long drive at Rose, and almost succeeded, with a stringing shot which, appeared to be out of the reach of Rose, but he partially saved it, only to see Hartley safely head it out of his reach. So much for the play, and now to the players. To commence with the victorious team, Hillman in goal despite the injury to his leg, mer met all exactions in good fashion, and the shots that defeated him were too adroitly placed, and sent in with such terrific force, for any goalkeeper to negotiate. Adams had a tough wing against him, and on the whole, came out remarkably well, some of his tackling of the Wolves as they steadied for shooting being exceptionally smart. Parry was some little time getting into his stride, and though he was occasionally beaten in the open, he was brimful of resource, when close in goal, and his judgement in placing the ball from a free kick was often most serviceable to his side. In the first portion of the game the display of the halfbacks was below the average, but following on the change of ends, whatever may have been their shortcoming at the outset, they more than made amends in the second period. Stewart worked hard and well and his hugh throwing in from touch was a very effective factor to the succcess of the team when near goal while Holt and Boyle especially in the closing stages, were more than a match for the Wolves forwards . Milward and Chadwick played a great game, and through Hartley lost a few chances early on, he justified his inclusion when the open game was resorted to. McInnes played a vastly improved game, and with Williams completed a strong line of attack. The Wolves forwards were too conservative in their style of play. As did Everton at the outset, they adopted the short passing line of action, at which they gave their opponents points, but they were not sufficiently astute to change their methods when they found fortune against them until there were a goal behind. Beats played a very fine centre forward game and with Wood got through a vast amount of work. While Griffin and Wyles, though the latter appealed to be somewhat indisposed, were not short of resources at critical moments. Nurse played effective left halfbacks game as also did Malpass in the centre and though Owen often contributed a good share, his work was marred by the rather vigorous methods he at time adopted. Baugh and Dunn, the former especially was magnificent defenders, and nothing short of the sudden change of tactics of the Evertonians would have brought about their downfall. Rose had little to do in the first half but in the second he was often called on, and did his work well. At the close of the proceedings a most disgraceful scene took place. The referee had occasion to rule the Wanderers left offside on putting the ball into the net, when close on time, and several times during the game his decisions were not accepted in a true sportsmanlike spirit. Immediately after the whistle blew a surging crowd bore down on Mr.Armitts end, but for the prompt assistance of police and officials series results have happened. Eventually the referee sought refuge in the pressbox, but it was not until some considerable time had elapsed that the crowd was cleared from the ground.

 

AUGUST 1895

BLUES 0 WHITES 4

August 26 1894. The Liverpool Mercury

The Everton Club turned out two elevens for a practice game on Saturday, before a large and enthusiasts crowd. The usual arrangements of playing the strongest forwards team on one side against the strongest defence on the other was adopted and a very pleasant and fairly fast game resulted. The Whites forward team comprising Latta, Bell, Hartley, Chadwick, and Milward, was a very smart lot, and worked nicely together. Four goals resulted from their efforts and Hillman, the blue goalkeeper, seemed to have no chance, the shot that scored. He however, brought off two or three very fine saves. Notably from Bell and Hartley. The latter appears to be in very good form at present, his speed in some instance bring exceptions. The Blue half backs and backs were Goldie, Storrier, Stewart, Adams Arridge and all played very creditably, the first named being undoubtedly as acquisition of the Blue forwards McInnes stood out prominently, and was very fast and tricky. A very much improved player in McDonald, the young back who was signed on last season. All the men seemed to have improved vastly since the first public game, but one or two of them still require to lose a little fresh. Today the club holds its annual picnic and sports at freshfields. Teams Blues: - Hillman, goal, Adams, and Arridges, backs, Gokdie, Storrier, and Stewart, halfbacks, Williams, McInnes, Reay, Flewitt, and Murray forwards. Whites: - Cook, goal, McDonald, and Parry, backs Kelso, Meiklehjohn, and Elliott, halfbacks, Latta, Bell, Hartley, Chadwick and Milward forwards .

 

EVERTON F.C. PICNIC AND SPORTS

August 27 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The annual picnic and sports organised by the Everton Football Club Company, Limited took place yesterday. A start was made shortly before noon from the Spellow House Hotel, a party of from 60 to 70 players Stewarts and officials of the club having assembled. The weather was somewhat dull, nut a drive from Goodison Park to the Grapes Hotel Freshfield, proved thoroughly enjoyable. On arrival a short programme of sports was gone through, the events being handicaps over distances of 100 yards, 440 yards, and one mile. W.Handford (8 yards) won the 100 yards, followed home by W.Wiliiam (5 yards) and S.Arridge, while J.W.Bell (8 yards) A.Milward (12 yards) and J.Elliott (8 yards) finished the quarter mile in the order indicated. D.Storrier (30 yards) H.Goldie won the mile (60 yards) being second, and A.Gilbert (third). An interesting football match between the directors and stewards of the club followed. After a several pleasant bowling tournaments on the excellent green, which adjoins the hotel, justice was done to a palatable and substantial dinner. The routs for the return journey was via, Bigwood, Thornton, and Aintree. Frequent showers of rain fell during the afternoon and evening, but the day was nevertheless one, which will be pleasantly remembered. Mr.R.Molyneux (secretary) efficiently arranged the programme, and the directors present were Dr.Baxter (chairman), Messrs Clayton (vice chairman), Kelly, Davies, Cuff, Bainbridge, Leyland, Hawshaw, and Prescott.

 

SEPTEMBER 1895

 

OPENING OF THE SEASON

September 2 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Today the resign of the football begins in real earnest, and the club managers, wherever it has been practicable, have spared no efforts in serving up the fare to their supporters at the first possible opportunity. Those state executives who, profiting from past experience have had their teams well under control during the month of August no doubt, find the ‘'athletic preparations fully exemplified before today is over; while those teams that replying upon former prestige don the jersey with a superfluity of flesh and a costing of rest, will find themselves left at the post. For an example of the inestimable value of careful preliminary training we need to go no further afield than Everton. A couple of seasons ago, early training was more or less a lackadaisical character, with the result that there matches were lost during the first month. It is absolutely essential that a team should be in the best of condition even for the first engagement, and last season the Everton executive were fully alive to this, for by the time the glorious first had arrival the men were in the pink of condition. And what was the result? A long list of successes both at home and away. This year, too, the management have adopted the same methods as last year, and assiduous training supplemented by practice games, which partook even the nature of League contests, have been occupying the attention of the supporters of the club during the past mouth, and no doubt the team will profit by the strict attention to training when they take part in the first League match against Sheffield Wednesday at Goodison Park this evening. There is very little is new record of the Everton club. The fixtures are much the same as usual- that is, they are made up chiefly of league engagements cup ties, and a few ‘'friendlies'' of the better class among the last named being those with Glasgow Rangers, Celtic, St.Mirren Hearts of Midlothians Sunderland, Casuals and Woolwich Arsenal, but the absence of the Liverpool Club from the list is much to be regretted, and it is hoped that ere long the difficulty of arranging fixtures will be overcome. With regard to the personnel of the team, it will be found almost identical with that of last season, and should occasion require the committee will have at hand very capable reserves to call upon for every position in the fill. A few days ago the outlook was not so promising, inasmuch as the settlement with Holt had not been effected; but now the matter have been amicable arrannged, and that there is to be upheaval in the half back line, one cannot but look for the success of the term with every degree of confidence. Judging from practice games, the attacking line in all that can be desired, and Boyle (who captains the team) and Stewart will be found as brimful of resource, as ever, while Kelso who has if anything much improved, can with Arridge be depended upon against the best of company, and Hillman, who at the practice game appeared more agile than ever, will not be found wanting in cleverness. The new men have given general satisfaction, so that difficulty in selecting a team even under the most adverse conditions will be reduced to a minimum. The second team of Everton will be members of the Football combination, and with such resources at their command it is safe to predict a clean sheet at the close of the season. The clubs forming the Combination this year are Chester, Everton Glossop North End, Leek, Macclesfield, Northwich Victoria, and Oldham County.

 

EVERTON 2 SHEFFIELD WEDNESDAY 2 (game 183)

September 3 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Charming weather more settled for Cricket than football, there was a fairly good lining of spectators, at Goodison Park. The teams, as will be seen from the list below, were much the same as last year. L.Bell playing centre for Wednesday, while Storrier was requisitioned to Holt position. At 5-45 the teams faced in the following in front of 12,000 spectators . Everton: - Hiillman, goal Kelso, and Arridges backs, Boyle (captain), Storrier, and Stewart halfbacks, Williams Bell Hartley, Chadwick, and Milward, forwards. Sheffield Wednesday: - Allan, goal, Earp (captain), and Langley, backs, Petrice, Crawshaw, and Jamieson, halfbacks, Brash, Ferrier, Bell, Brady, and Spikesley forwards. Referee Mr. Armitt. The Sheffield Skipper won the toss, and Hartley facing the glaring sun set the ball in motion. The first movements were somewhat sturdy eventually Arridge opened the game for Williams but he overran himself and then Earp had cleared ably. Milward and Chadwick made a dash on the left, which resulted in the former screwing the ball onto the top of the net. The Wednesday forwards broke away in nice combination, when Storrier unfortunately foul an opponent, and from the free kick, Bell head through the game having being in progess about five minutes. Sheffield become very aggressive and Hillman saving from Spikseley and other forwards in great style. At Length Bell scored a second point from the Sheffield club. At Length grand work by Hartley, Milward and Chadwick almost brought about the desired point, and a moment later afterwards the last named player under great difficulties sent in a grand shot which, justed needed a touch from Bell, but this was not forthcoming and the whistle sounded immediately afterwards for the interval. Sheffield leading by two goals to nil. A few minutes after resuming a splendid opening was given to Hartley in front of goal there being practically no opponents but a miskick enabled Langley to get up in time to clear. The luck continued to favour the visitors who were often fortunate in meeting the ball when banged into goal, and the height of disappointment was reached as a couple of free kicks in good position were got away in neat easy fashion. A visit to the other end brought out Hillman to brash, and again to Bell, the custodian's judgement in dealing with the latter's attempt to rush the ball through being very fine indeed. Diverting the ball from Bell's toe, to gave possession to Milward who in conjunction with his partner, worked it nicely down only to receive feeable assistance from the halves Storrier especially being faulty. Hartley headed in beautifully to Allen who brought of a smart save and almost immediately afterwards the Wednesday goal had another marvellous escape. At length a long shot from Boyle took effect twelve minutes from time, and on getting to work again the Evertonians fairly bore down on the Sheffield goal. One of their all but put the teams on equal terms, the corner kick being the first that had taken place in the match. Three minutes later Hartley scored the equaling goal from a well-placed corner by Chadwick. A chance to take the lead was given to Hartley, but he shot skied the net. Towards the close the Wednesday forwards made a big effort, and Hillman was thrice called upon. Kicking out in the last stage was a frequently manourve of the Wednesday backs, but no further points were scored, and a good game resulted of two goals each. From an Everton point of view the game was most disappointing. Although individually the play was good there was not that equanimity and cohesion action, among the players which, one has been accountioned to witness. This effort of the forwards were spasmodic in character, and had they in the first half infused but a mostly of the vigor that characteristic their movements in the second portion when they played an absolutely winning game, success with a substantial margin, must have attended them. The halve were at time rocky, and Holt's reappearance in the team will be anxiously awaited. The backs and goalkeeper had an exacting time, and came out fairly well. The Wednesday team, as a whole are a well balanced lot, and should have a good season, though the two point that they scored and the marvellous saves that were effected under the most unlooked for conditions Stamped them at any rate last evening as a very lucky team.

 

LIVERPOOL AND DISTRICT COMBINATION 1 EVERTON 5

September 4 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

This match, in aid of the funds of the Liverpool and District Association, was played lastnight on the new ground of the St. Elphine Club. Warrington, and resulted in a win for Everton by 5 goals to 1. The teams were as follows: - Everton: - Cook, goal, McDonald and Parry, backs, Jones, Holt, and Elliott halfbacks, Reay, Murray, Mainman Flewitt, and Scholield forwards. Liverpool and District Combination: - J.W.Robson, (captain), (warrington St Elphin's) goal, Taylor (c) (st Elphins), and McFarland (j) (Hudson's Athletci), backs, Fox (m) (Edgehill and Wavertree), Hughes (h) (Formby), and Molyneux (Kirkdale) hlafbacjs, Ireland (w) (Garston Copper Works), Cunningham (j) (Hudson Athletics), Dugdale (j) (warrington St. Elphins), Price (j) (Garston Copper Works), and Marr (j) (Hudson's Athletci) forwards.

 

EVERTON 6 NOTTS FOREST 2 (game 184)

September 9 1895. THE Liverpool Mercury

Notts Forest, who had so creditably disposed of the Bury team on Thurdsay, furnished the attraction at Goodison Park on Saturday, and at the commencement of the game a crowd of about 15,000 strong, which increased in numbers as play progessed lined the enclosure. There were changes in both teams from those, which took part in the initial League contest, and a big burst of applause went around the ground as Holt put in an appearance with his old comrades. Prompt to time the teams lined up as follows: - Everton: - Hillman, goal Kelso, and Adams, backs Boyle (captain), Holt, and Stewart, backs, Williams, Bell Flewitt, Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Notts Forest: - Allsopp, goal, Ritchies, and Scott, backs, Stuart (a), McPherson, and Forman (f), halfbacks, Pike, Carnally Kerr, Forman (fr), and McInnes, forwards. The Forest won the toss, and soon, the kick off the Evertonians got clean away, Chadwick missing the net by the mearest shave. Some very effective passing on the part of Cassidy and Pike resulted in Adams services being called into requision, and a moment later Holt came in for a round of applause on twice robbing Kerr and placing his forwards in possession, and them followed some magnificent passing by the whole of the front line, bell putting the ball slightly wide of the upright. The play of the home forwards was now simply brilliant and after Williams, Bell and Chadwick had tried in vain to pillow the ball into the net. Milward met a return from Allsopp which, Chadwick had levelled, and from a difficult position though close in, scored the first goal nine minutes from the start. The restart brought no charge in the general run of the game, the smart tackling of the halves and accurate movements of the forwards being very striking incidents of play. Meanwhile the Forest left put in some capital bit of play. McInnes especially during good work, but being opposed to Boyle at his best, but little headway could be made. Eventually the Forest van lobbed the ball on, and Forman sent in a beautiful shot at Hillman who saved in his accustomed style, and during the next few minutes the Everton defenders had an anxious time, especially so when ‘'hands'' was given against them close in. Williams got the ball away, and after McPherson the Forest centre half, had failed to arrest Flewitt it looked long odds on the Everton centre booking a scored point. He overran the ball in his final effort, but was well attended by Chadwick, who had a clear field, and notched the second point after 23 minutes play. Following this reverse the Foresters played up briskly, and swarmed round Hillman's charge, but again such sterling defenders, as Holt Stewart, and Boyle who repeatedly broke up all attempts at combination, their prospects of scoring were not at any time bright. A long lunge from Stewart, changed venue and Chadwick sent in a swift straight shot, which took effect, and within a minute Stewart all but repeated the performance. Milward and Chadwick broke away cleverly and drawing round then, left the field clear for Flewitt, who took full advantage of the opening efforted him by regulating the fourth goal of the match. The Forest halves were simply powerless against the Everton line, who times after time raced down in very pretty fashion. A couple of corners came to nothing, and the interval arrived with Everton leading by 4 goals to nil.

Immediately on resuming, the Forest forward gave promise of running close quarters, and during the first five minutes they combined with far greater effect than at any period in the first half. F.R.Forman seemed to have the goal at his mercy, but there was no defeating the burly Evertonians who scooped the ball away, and again saved a low shot at the corner. This bombardment finished up the home lot, who got off in an irresistible swing, and on the forwards gathering in the goalmouth, Bell fell back and waited his opportunity, which soon came, with a strong low shot gave Allsopp no chance of saving. Play had scarely been resumed when Williams and Bell raced prettily down, and on the insider putting a timely touch in the direction of Milward the last named player banged the ball past Ritchie and Allsopp into the net. Pulling themselves together the Reds worked the ball nicely down the field, but the final efforts were feeble in the extreme. McInnes had a good opening and shot in strongly, but had the misfortune of seeing the ball rebound from the crossbar, and after Flewitt had attired the enthusiasm of the Everton spectators with a brilliant run down, F.Forman put in a high shot which, Hillman saved at the expense of a fruitless corner. Then followed a period of even play about midfield. When Carnelly and Pike sprinted off, the former scoring the Forest first with a shot that completely beat Hillman. During the next few minutes Holt put in a tremendous amount of work, and eventually gave Bell possession, who fastening on the ball, fairly cut out the pace, and sent in a beauty cross shot, which only required the least touch from Milward, but this was not forthcoming. A few minutes later McInnes lay in good position and shot in strongly, but at the crossbar. The efforts of the visitors were rewarded in the last minute of play, when F.R.Forman put the ball out of Hillman's reach, but had the latter not slipped the point would probably have been easily warded off. Nothing further was done, and Everton won by 6 goals to 2.

 

EVERTON REVIEW

September 9 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Despite the unpromising outlook in the morning on Saturday, when Everton engaged in their second League League encounter the afternoon turned out beautifully fine, and from a spectator's point of view left nothing to be desired. It is quite possible that the players if consulted, might have preferred a little less sun, but on the other hand, the executive of the club must welcome a bright and pleasant afternoon on account of the increased receipts, for although the weather seems to make no different at all to the real football enth8ususm. Yet there are a great number who fell that it is not worth risking the discomfort of a wetting to watch a match in which, the play is considerably deteriorated by a sloppy and slippery ground. At Goodison Park on Saturday a crowd of quite 18,000 followed the game with eagerness and excitement and in addition seemed to be thoroughly enjoying themselves, for their favourites were in one of their best moods. After their very poor display against Sheffield Wednesday on Monday last it was quite refreshing to witness the magnificent passing of the forwards well and judiciously fed by their halves. It is doubtedly to the latter division that the immense improvement in Saturday's play is due, and it leads one at once to think what an extensive difference Holt makes to the team. It seems almost a moral effect he has, for all departments play a vastly improved game. On Saturday Boyle, Holt, and Stewart adopted the tactics pursued by the international halves against Scotland on the Everton ground early in the year, and when as was several times the case, they could not see their way clear to put the ball nicely to their forwards, they passed to one another with the invariable result that the ball, when got rid of was placed at one of the forwards toes, and not as is too often the case, justed kicked aimlessly up the field. The halfback passing game has another great advantage as it draws away the first line of defence in the opposing halfbacks and thus leaves the forwards peer when they do get the ball. The forward line was the same that did duty on Monday, with the exception of Flewitt the Lincoln City recuit, who took Hartley's place in the centre position, and who was an undoubted success. His passing is smart and exact, and he has in addition speed and strength, and with just a little more precision in shooting, he should prove one of the best. Milward and Chadwick were in great form as their old clubmate. Alec Stewart will testify. Williams and Bell completed the quintet these also playing in sterling fashion. Some very pretty bits of triangular passing between them and Boyle were witness. Milwards second goal being the direct result of one of these. The backs Adams and Kelso, were very safe, especially in the first half and Hillman in goal brought off some magnificent saves, so that one may forgive him for letting two shot through which, under ordinary conditions, he would have cleared. In the case of the second goal recored against him he obviously tripped and fell short of the ball. He proved a tower of strength in the term, his judgement in taking the ball right off an opponents from being unerring. Then again, he was so cool when learing, and could not be rushed by the opposing forwards, most of whom looked twice before attempting to charge the big man through his goal. It is a great pleasure to have nothing but congratulations to chronicle for our local team. They played a magnificent game on Saturday and fully deserved their handsome victory of six goals to two. If they could only keep up this form all through the season and is a consummation devoutly to be wished high honours are certainly assured them. Unfortunately accidents, indisposition, and the like chip in at time, and jar the smooth working of every football team and it is to be hoped, that Everton share of these misfortunate will be very light. Milward (2), Chadwick (2), Flewitt, and Bell scored the goals for Everton. There were three changes in the Nottingham team from that which, defeated Bury so decisively on Thursday last, F.R.Forman Kerr (the old Liverpool Forwards) and F.Forman displacing Shaw, Rose, and McCracken respectively. Of the forwards McInnes and F.R.Forman were beyond question the best. Kerr was timid and quite outclassed. F.Forman on the left, was the pick of the halfbacks and this player made a very good show at times in spite of the clever forward wing that he had against him, whilst McPherson and Alec Stewart worked hard, but with little effect. The backs, Ritchie and Scott, were a long time in settling down to their work, and indeed, in the first half they were far from attaining, a high standard, but in the second portion of play they showed up brilliantly on several occasions. The beautiful and well timed passing of the opposing forwards completely mastered them, and Allsopp in goal had a very hard and anxious time, and he not made some really brilliant saves the score against his club would have been much heavier. Towards the end of the second half the Everton men, satisfied with their substantial lead, appeared to be inclined to take things easily, and it was then that Notts succeeded in obtaining their two goals, which were recored by Carnelly and F.R.Forman. It would be well to impress upon Evertonians the importance of keeping an eye on the goal averages, which in this era of keen competition is a very important in the event of a close race for championship of the League. This evening at 5-30 the Bury team, which has had anything but a pleasant experience since their inclusion in the first League rank, will put in an appearance at Goodison Park.

The season opened at Goodison Park on Monday evening last when Sheffield Wednesday furnished the visiting side, and for a midweek match the game was largely patronised. The display of the home team was not up to expectation, and laded during the first half they were simply outclassed by the Blades, whose forwards were ever keen on the ball and withal effective when anywhere within range of goal. Crawshaw the Wednesday half, was most successful in breaking up whatever attempts at combination the Evertonians indulged in and on the left Jamieson was most assiduous in his attentions to those in front of him. The full backs had plenty of resource, and on the whole the Blackburn were voted to have a finely balanced team which, should carry then successfully through their engagements. Through the Everton team falled in the first portion they somewhat made amends in the second; but it was a case of touch, and go with then, and their supporters heavily a sigh of relief when their men drew up level. The absence of Holt had perhaps much to do with the lack of combination, which was apparent throughout the proceeding; but at the same time the side was not favoued with anthing like the amount of lack that came in the way of the visitors.

 

EVERTON 3 BURY 2 (game 185)

September 10 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The first visit of the Bury team as full-blown first Leaguers did not arouse too much enthusiasm as was expected and the aggregate of the crowd numbered about 8,000. The teams were: - Everton: - Hillman, goal, Kelso, and Adams backs Goldie Boyle (captain), and Stewart, halfbacks, Williams, Bell, Fleapit, Chadwick, and Milward, forwards. Bury: - Montgomery, goal, Davidson, and Davies, backs, Pray, Clegg, and Ross, halfbacks, Wylie, Moonie, Barbour, Henderson, and Plant, forwards. Mr. Kirkham, Darwen referee. Everton won the toss and taking advantage of the wind and sun were the first to show up, Flewitt almost getting through in the first few minutes. A foul to Bury gave temporary relief, and Plant and Henderson ran down, Hillman having to handle smartly to effort a clearance. Moonie and Wylie got in some pretty effective passes on the Bury right, but they failed to make any impression on the home defence, and on Adams finally clearing Flewitt and Bell combined nicely, with the result the latter player sent in a stinging shot, which found its way into the net after striking the under portion of the crossbar. Play had no sooner been resumed then the ball was again worked down to the Bury quarters and Chadwick sent in a slow shot at Montgomery, who slipped, and no, 2 goal was registered. Except for an occasional burst by Plant and Henderson whose pass was high over the bar by Moonie the Everton team were in complete possession of the game, and after 20 minutes Milward ran in and converted a rattling good pass by Williams into the third point. Shots all too high were levelled by Bell, Chadwick, and Goldie, after which Kelso was beset by his opponents, but Adams came to the rescue, and cleared easily. Milward took up the running and drove hard in when near goal, but Davidson charged his shot down, as his partner did also to another directly following from Williams. Dilatory play by the Bury forwards let in Everton again, and play was exceedingly tame for some time the Bury backs miskicking on several occasions. At length Wylie got past Stewart but upon being faced by Adams kicked wildly over the bar. Nothing of any racement followed. Beynold some tall kicking till the visiting right again got to work and Wylie although sandwiched by Adams and Stewart passed forward to Moonie, who drove in splendid style, bringing out Hillman with a magnificent effort, who conceded a corner. From this point Wylie placed in so accurately that Plant easily defeated Hillman after clearing with a good shot close in. during the next few minutes the Bury forwards, taking advantage of some rather loose play on the part of the Everton defenders, often came within reach of Hillman, and eventually Wylie, who was palpably offside, put the ball into the net, and to the great astonishment of the spectators and players alike, the referee allowed the goal. The second reverse fairly aroused the Evertonians, who swarmed round Montgomery's charge and shots were rained in thick and fast, but the Custodian was at this juncture full of resource, and cleared admirably. A few minutes later the whistle announced the interval, when the scored stood- Everton, 3 goals, Bury 2. The second half opened woth the Everton forwards in possession, and Williams sent in a shot which, however, lacked fire. Bell followed with a couple of attempts, the result of fine passing by his partner but both went wide, following which Barbour out in some timely touches to Plant, who completely defeated Kelso, and sent in a grand cross shot, which glided past the bar, and again after Moonie and wylie had worked the ball down the left, Henderson shot in, but this with no better result. At length Williams appealed to have a fine opening, but Davidson chipped in neatly, and a moment later Chadwick had the disappointment of seeing one of his noted screw shot just missing the net by inches. From an Everton point of view play livened up considerably, and for some time the ball was kept bobbing about the Bury defence, but both Davidson and Davies met all efforts to score with good injudgement. From a breakaway by the centre Wylie got possession, and sent in a magnificent shot, which just grazed the crossbar. The same player followed with another, and Hillman, in falling forward to save, was met by Plant, who was rushing across, and received a nasty kick on the head, which caused some little delay in the proceedings. Getting to work again, Bury had just slightly the lead in movements, mainly through weakness of the left half, who was often out his place, a defeat which the Bury left were not slow to take advantage of however, by some sterling play on the part of Boyle and Stewart, danger was often averted, though several times it was found expedient to drive back to Hillman when hard pressed. Chadwick and Milward at length got off, and the former sent in a hot shot, which rebounded from the crossbar, and within the next few minutes the same player followed with a couple, but there was no defeating the Bury backs, who defended their charge magnificently. Getting away again, a couple of corners fell to Bury, but nothing came of them. At this juncture Milward fell back to strengthen the defence, and play which, all through the second half was not at the greatness character, took a most vigorous turn, not unmixed with a sprinkling rough methods. Nothing further was scored, and Everton won by 3 goals to 2.

 

TRANMERE ROVERS RESERVES 1 EVERTON RESERVES 2

September 10 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

These clubs opposed each other in friendly rivalry at Tranmere last evening, before fully 2,000 spectators. Jeffs kicked off uphill, for the Rovers, who made headway up the right wing McKinley and Rendall being especially prominent. McKinley tested Cook with a fine shot, but Parry and McDonald eventually relieved the pressure. Everton attacked in turn McInnes Reay, and Murray, by a sequence of pretty passing, got within shooting distance of Baxter and after Spencer had effected a clearance Hill got hold and defeated Baxter. Jeffs Rendall and McKinlay were cheered for grand play up the centre and right wing and Jeff experienced very hard line with a shot, which went over the crossbar off Parry's head. Halftime-Everton 1 goal, Tranmere Rovers nil. On charging ends the Rovers playing down hill, created a most favorable impression, by the combined attack on the Everton goal, which for a time proved impenetrable, so well was it defended by Elliott McDonald, and Parry. Lawrence and Hilton put in some clever work, and once Hilton met a lovely centre from Rendell, which Cook however saved. Still crowding around the Everton goal, the Rovers made matters extremely warm for the visitor's defence. McKinley sent in a shot which Parry charged down, but Douglas (who was lying well down the field) passed to Jeffs, who equalised the game with a beautiful shot, which passed into the net just under the crossbar quite out of Cook's reach. McInnes changed places with Hill which resulted in Everton adding another goal McInnes received a centre from Hill and tested Baxter, who cleared temporarily but McInnes met the ball once more and placed the issue beyond doubt. A couple of free kicks and a abortive corner afterwards gave Everton a chance to increase their score, but Price Spencer, and Davidson were in champion form for the Rovers, and repelled quite a number of dangerous shots. Result Everton 2 goals Tranmere Rovers 1 goal. Teams- Everton: - Cook, goal, Parry, and McDonald, backs, Elliott, Melklejohn, and Jones, halfbacks, Reay, McInnes, Hill, Murray, and Scholfield, forwards, Tranmere Rovers: - Baxter, goal, Spencer (w), and Price, backs, Davidson, Douglas, and Anderson, halfbacks, McKinley, Rendell, Jeffs, Lawrence, and Hilton, forwards.

 

BOLTON WANDERERS 3 EVERTON 1 (game 186)

September 16 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Bolton Wanderers open their new ground, Burnden Park

The Everton team visited Bolton on Saturday the occasion being the opening of the Wanderers new ground at Burden Park. A large following of Evertonians travelled by execursion trains from Exchanged Station and for some considerable time before the commencement of the proceedings the ground and its appointments, which were greatly admired, were the topics of general conversation. The Wanderers executive are to be congratulated on the result of their work, for excellent provision for both standing and sitting accommodation has been made, and when the work is completed they will posses one of the finest grounds in the country. An additional attraction in the shape of a cycle contest, which commenced an hour before the match, served to while away, the time, and at four o'clock, when the teams faced, there would be quite 12,000 spectators present. The teams were as follows: - Wanderers: - Sutcliffe, goal, Somerville and Jones, backs, Paton McGeachan, and Fairbairn halfbacks, Martin, Brown Joyce, Wright, and Cassidy, forwards: - Everton: - Hillman, goal, Kelso, and Adams backs, Boyle (captain), Holt, and Stewart halfbacks, Bell McInnes Fewitt, Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Mr. John Lewis referee. Everton won the toss and Joyce opened the play on behalf of the Wanderers. The game began somewhat tamely, and following some neat work on the part of Stewart, Milward and Chadwick fastened on the ball, and on Somerville coming to the rescue of his side, the sphere was sent over to Bell, who shot grandly in to Sutcliffe, but without effect. A free kick to the Wanderers brought about a charge of venue, but Holt stood in the way of further progess; and Flewitt made off, only to be robbed by Somerville, who put in a hugh punt up the field, and eventually Wright and Cassidy forced the play on the Wanderers left, a moment which, culminated by Martin shooting in at Hillman, who was penalised for running at the ball, but the Wanderers lost headway, as Freebairn shot badly to the net. From a free kick, taken by Boyle at halfway, the ball glided off Flewitt's head to Sutcliffe who was lucky in reaching it, and then McInnes was twice penalised, which resulted in relief of the Wanderers goal. Returning again Boyle just missed scoring from a beautifully taken corner kick, and immediately afterwards the ball was lobbed to the other end, where Hillman's resource were ably tested by Wright, Cassidy and Brown. A severe pressure was kept up, and eventually Martin lifted the ball over the bar. Again the play swerved to the other end, and Milward only missed the mark by inches. Following some sterling halfback play, the home forwards got fairly under way, but Kelso defended superbly, and often kicked and headed the ball out with good judgement. At this juncture Holt and Wright made for the ball the former to head it and the latter to kick it. Holt headed the ball away, but in doing so also came in contact with Wright's foot, and as the accident was at the time serious he had to retire from the field, this misfortune happening after 23 minutes play. Milward went centre half, and at once the Wanderers pressed severely. Cassidy shot in, and as Hillman only partially saved Martin rushed the ball into the net 25 minutes from the commencement. Free kicks now became frequent, and the general play resulted in heavily pressure on Hillman's charge. In close Flewitt called upon Sutcliffe, but the effort was rather weak, and again McInnes had an easy chance to equalise, but his effort was also tame. A long kick by Jones completely changed the scene, and the home forwards swarmed down on the Everton defenders. Brown at length round Adams and drove the ball across to Cassidy who ably met it and called upon Hillman. The custodian attempted to tip the ball over the bar, but it race straight and from the scrimmage it was rushed into the net for the second time. A magnificent run down by Brown was the next item, and then Chadwick raised the hopes of the Everton crowd on having command in an easy position, but he had the misfortune to see his attempt charged down a similar experienced awaiting a further effort, a few minutes later. Bell next tried his luck, and just grazed the post, and then Joyce made off until Adams brought him up as he was steadying for a shot and assisted by Kelso, the Everton van again got into a good swing. Somerville missed the kick and Chadwick appeared to have a certain goal at his command when Jones crossed over and robbed him beautifully. From a subsequently goal kick Bell fastened on the ball, and passing smartly to McInnes the latter shot in at the corner, giving Sutcliffe no chance to clear. Halftime now arrived with the wanderers leading by 2 goals to 1. On resuming Holt rejoined his comrades, and getting to work the Evertonians were the first to assert themselves. Milward all but put the ball through at the corner, and from the goalkick Mcinnes followed suit, after Bell had completely beaten Jones. A foul charge in goal relieved Sutcliffe, but for some time the Everton forwards had the upper hand, but could not break through the defence of Somerville and Jones. Then Hillman had a warm time as Cassidy and Martin levelled clever shots, and frequently scrimmaging took place in the twelve yard's line. Brown shot high over the bar, and then Flewitt was in grand position, but was ruled offside, and by a series of long kicks the ball was once again bobbling round Hillman's charge. The goalkeeper brought off a magnificent save from Joyce after Cassidy had worked the ball down. Eventually Wright screwed across from the corner, and Joyce headed in with capital judgement. The later stages were until the last minutes fairly even, and as nothing further was scored, the Wanderers won a fair game by 3 goals to 1.

 

EVERTON RESERVES 6 LEEK 0

September 16 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

These teams met at Goodison Park on Saturday for a Combination match, before a fair number of spectators. The home team tried several new players Jones (Wrexham) Hues (Oswestry), and Scholfield (aintree Church) being given a trail. The names of the teams were as follows: - Everton: - Hues goal, McDonald and Storrier backs, Jones Melklejohn, and Elliott halfbacks, Reay, Murray Mainman, Hill, and Schofield forwards. Leek: - Critchlow goal, Low, and Cantral, backs Birch, Hudson, and Bratt, halfbacks, Keats, Lowe, Pratt, Bell, and Swinson, forwards. Right from the kick off Everton were much superior all round, but general defensive tactics by the Leeks team kept Everton at bay for some time and Half time arrived with Everton leading, but one goal to nil. On resuming however, they grandly put a different complexion in the proceedings, and as the result of excellent forward play, ran out easy winners by 6 goals to nil.

 

EVERTON REVIEW

September 16 1895. The Liverpool mercury

Everton fell victim to Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. The two scored by the Wanderers in the first half were samples of the luck; the long kicking across the field of play though neither interesting nor scientific was at the same time full of exciting moments. As for fastance when Everton defence was completely non plussed the ball reached Hillman in the mouth of goal, who attempted to save and partially did so, but owing to the Wanderers charging with keen judgement, Hillman efforts was frustrated, and the ball was forced into the net. Similar circumstances and fate attending the second downfall of the Everton citadel. Both of these goals may be considered were lucky for had Hillman only had a moment's more time each would probably have been saved. After this second disaster the visitors seemed best upon taking revenge, and although numerically handicapped they set to with a will, and in evidence of the same after some very, smart play, combined with pretty passing they managed to decrease their opponents lead. After the interval Holt, reappeared, but seemed to be thoroughly upset by his accident, and was of very little use; in fact it would have been more to Everton advantage had to he not rejoined his comrades, as he had by no means recovered from the shock. Both teams were now working practically on the same lines as far as style of play was concerned, but not once during the second portion did the Evertonians look like a winning team and a third goal which resulted from one of the smartest bits of play in the match was recored against them the Wanderers thus emerging by three goals to one. Sutcliffe in goal was as effective as ever, both in resource at critical moments and in kicking and in Somerville and Jones the club had most able defenders. The halfbacks line was a well balanced out. Paton's burly form was often in evidence, and McGeechan, in the centre, was responsible for many fine touches, which gave those in front excellent openings while Fairbairns, on the left was mainly prominent by the close attention to Bell, to whom he struck like a leach throughout the whole game. The forwards worked out their style of play to a nicely. Martin who displaced Tannahill on the outside right, created a favourable impression, and Brown, Wright, and Cassidy had plenty of openings from Joyce, who was a very capable centre. The Everton forwards were somewhat erractic, and much of their disconfidence must be attributed to scant support from the halfbacks line. While Bell and Mcinnes had plenty of work to do, Chadwick and Milward were practically left to make their own play, and especially was this the case in the second portion of the game. Flewitt was not a success in the centre, and Mcinnes did not shine in his position, and we may excpect to find the front rank differently constituted in the next League encounter. Stewart worked hard throughout, and put in some finished work against Martin and Brown who were at their best, and on the other wing Boyle often checked Wright and Cassidy, and put Bell in possession, but there were occasions when it would have been more profitable to have stung the ball over to the left. Adams was often hard pressed, and did his work well, while Kelso played with excellent tact and judgement. Hillman was in good form, and it was his misfortunate not fault, that the score was so pronounced.

 

EVERTON 0 BLACKBURN ROVERS 2 (game 187)

SEPTEMBER 23 1895. THE Liverpool Mercury

Beautifully fine weather, tempered by an invigorating breeze, favoured the first of the League fixtures between Everton, and the Rovers at Goodison Park, as Saturday last, and as the visitors are always great favourites with Liverpool generally it was in keeping with old traditions that the ground should be well patronised. There were some 18,000 spectators present at the commencement of the game, and the numbers increased as the play progressed. Rovers had a special course of training for the event, and were represented by the strongest available team that the executive could command. While on the other hand further changes were made in the home ranks. Flewitt stood down for Hartley, and Williams who has recovered from his injury, again took his position on the outside right. There was some doubt as to weather Hillman would be at his post as he received a kick in the Bolton Wanderers match which left him rather lame, but he turned out all right, and at four o'clock the teams lined up as follows : - Everton: - Hillman, goal, Kelso, and Adams, backs, Boyle (captain), Holt, and Stewart, halfbacks, Williams, Bell, Hartley, Chadwick, and Milward forwards. Blackburn Rovers: - Ogilvie goal, Brandon and Murray, backs, Dewar, Anderson, and Cleghorn, halfbacks, Haydock, Whitehead, Turnbull, Killean, and Chippendale, forwards. The Rovers lost the toss, and on Turnbull putting the ball in motion Killean and Chippendale at once got off and the latter swinging the ball across Whitehead shot in gradually, but had the misfortune to see the ball rebound from the Crossbar. The early attack, which resulted from most accurate movements, on the part of the forwards, at once proved that the Evertonians had a severe task on hand, especially so when a couple of minutes later Turnbull just failed to score by a few inches. Adams effected a slight relief, but no impression could be made upon the Rovers halfbacks line, and the left wing once again led on the attack. Kelso was penalised, and Turnbull did not take what appeared a fairly good chance. Eventually the home forwards were in possession, and the ball travelled across in short stages from Williams to Milward. Dewar was beaten, but there was no getting round Brandon, who covered his custodian most cleverly. Some tricky though not effective work by Haydock was the next item, and after Whitehead had failed to take up the running Stewart drove the ball on to Hartley who was unfortunately rulled offside. Meanwhile Dewar, Anderson, and Cleghorn had been doing excellent work, and took full advantage of the shortcoming of the Everton van. A free kick against the home side resulted in a long shot at Hillman who cleared well, but Anderson met the return, and with a well judged hard drive piloted the ball into the net after the game had been in progess but six minutes. Getting to work again, Hartley tested Ogilvie, but the shot lacked string, and following the clearance Cleghorn all but scored from a free kick against Bell. Kelso was doing good work, and a smart bit of play by Holt changed the venue to Ogilvie's charge and here Chadwick made a capital attempt to head the ball into the net. Then followed some pretty and effective play by Haydock and whitehead, between whom there was a perfect understanding, but in the final stage the latter was ruled offside. At length Stewart made an opening for Milward, who banged the ball in at a terrictic tae; but it happened to be drive straight at the goalkeeper, who cleaned, and then Brandon conceded a fruitless corner. At the other end Killean tested Hillman, who fisted out strongly, following which, Hartley, though surrounded by opponents, brought off a magnificent shot, which however, passed slightly wide of the post. During the next few minutes the Everton forwards had several openings, and the ball was put anywhere but between the uprights. A long pressure followed on the Rovers goal, which was brought to an end on Holt lifting the ball over the bar. Turnbull created quite a diversion in the centre, and eventually put Haydock in possession, who could certainly have scored, but for the close attentions of Adams, who, after, being beaten. Smartly recovered himself. A few minutes later every, one was expecting Chadwick to equalised as a good opening presented itself; but like the others he was a long way out of his reckoning, as the ball sailed high over the bar. On the right, Williams put in grand shot, which Brandon only partially met, and had the left been, well up a goal must have been scored. The interval was announced shortly afterwards, the Rovers leading by one goal to none. Everton got well away after the change of ends and Hartley had a shot at goal which, was just a trifle wide. Bell and Williams who were closely attended to by Murray, put in a lot of work, but so keen were the Rovers defenders in being on the man about to shoot that the final attempts appeared to be very amateurish. At last Chippendale got round Boyle and centred to Turnbull and as Kelso only partially checked the movement. Whitehead cleverly met the ball and drove it hard into the net. Hillman having no chance whatever with it. This second reverse happened ten minutes after the restart, and the ball had no sooner been put into play again than the diminutive inside right almost brought another disaster to Everton as he headed the ball slightly wide of the net. Following some sterling play by Stewart the home forwards got into their old stride, and was frequently dangerous. Hartley sent in a fine shot across the goal, which Williams only justed missed meeting, and in the next minutes Chadwick met with no better luck after getting round Brandon. Some little delay was caused owing to Holt and Killean coming into collision, and on getting to work again Hillman, who had ran out to have was fortunate in not being defeated for a third time as Chippendale had the goal, at his mercy, but shot terribly wide. After a fruitless attempt to get round, Murray and Brandon Turnbull gathered his line together and a very pretty movement brought the play to the Everton goal, where Kelso Adams and Hillman had a most anxious time. Some brilliant saves were effected, and it was not until Stewart had outwitted Haydock and whitehead, after both had been revailing shots, that the pressure was relieved. There was no further scoring though the remaining play was favorable to the Rovers, and Everton received their first defeat at home by 2 goals to nil.

 

MACCLESFIELD 2 EVERTON RESERVES 2

September 23 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Played at Macclesfield on Saturday. The visitors favoured by the elements, and though the ran on fairly even lines they scored before change of ends. After the interval the play a totally different turn, as the home side play up level, and afterwards took the lead, but on the Evertonians equalising, and the remained a draw of 2 goals each. The Everton combination found the Macclesfield team in first rate condition at home, and though they took the lead in the early portion of the play by a goal from Scholfield, and were somewhat fortunate in ultimately gaining a point.

Played 3 won 2, lost 0 draw 1, for 11 against 4 points 5

 

EVERTON REVIEW

September 23 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

Beautiful summer weather favoured Everton first meeting with the Blackburn Rovers on Saturday, and the games between these teams are always of an attractive description there was an exceptionally big crowd present at the commencement of the proceedings. The field had been very carefully prepared, and presented a perfect appearance the grass, which, in previous games was much too long and impeded the players having been cut and well rolled. From the kick off Blackburn Rovers were quickly down at the Everton goal and it early became evident that they meant to make matters for the home team. Their efforts were soon rewarded, for about six minutes from the start Hillman ran out to clear a shot, and before he could get back to his charge Anderson the Rovers centre half sent in a long hard drive, which took effect. Encouraged by this early success, the visitors played a magnificent game, but did not increase their lead up to halftime. After the interval, the team set to work in earnest fashion, but the Rovers excelled in the nicer points of play, and invariably had the best of the exchanges. By means of some smart play on the part of Chippendale, Turnbull and whitehead, the last named scored with a remarkably fine shot, which completely defeated Hillman, and indeed it is questionable if any custodian under similar conditions could have saved his charge. From the point up to the close of the game the Rovers held the upper hand, although there were occasions when the home team broke away, and appeared dangerous but they were met by such a superb defence that their onslaught brought little or no success, and when the whistle sounded they retired beaten by two goals to nil. It is a long time since Everton have been beaten pointless on their own ground and it was very unfortunate for them that they should meet the Rovers in such tip top form before they have properly got into their stride. The play of the home team on the whole was only fair, the back division, if anything being the weakest. This deficiency necessitated the halfback line paying especial attention to the defensive tactics, and they were consequently unable to aid their side as much as usual attacking. The forwards when they obtained possession put in some very fine touches of passing at times, but they were seldom properly backed up, and consequently could make out little impression on the stern defence that met them. Chadwick was not up to the standard of play, and was robbed of the ball a great deal often than usual. Hartley played a good game individually, but did not keep his wings well together and, as individually at the expense of combination cannot be depended upon to win matches, this point must command attention. The outside men, Milward and Williams were perhaps the best of the forwards, though the latter's shooting was erratic. The halfbacks put in a lot of work, and at times were very effective, but Holt is not yet in conditions, and a fast game like that of Saturday told more than a trifle on him. The backs were as already stated rather weak, for their kicking was neither strong nor clean, and they were not smart enough when the Rovers got within shooting range to prevent them getting in their shots. Hillman brought off many fine saves, but he was very lame, and it is no doubt due to this that the first goal was scored, as he was unable to get back to his charge quickly enough. The team were also on this account deprived of the benefit of his hugh kicks, which when the defence is pressed, are often of such sterling value. Too high praise cannot be bestowed on the Rovers, for the fine display. They were in better condition, more resourceful, and withal more accurate man to man than their opponents and the special training that they had undergone last week for this particular match has thus served them well. Their forwards were very smart and tricky, and a special word is due to Turnbull, the centre, for the very capable way in which, he kept his wings employed. In their onslaught on the Everton goal they were always dangerous and they had the satisfaction of knowing that a thoroughly efficient trio of halfbacks backed them up. The full backs Brandon and Murray, played a strong, and safe game, and very rarely indeed did they allow the home forwards to get within dangerous shooting distance. Ogilvie the goalkeeper, had a very little to do but when he was called upon there was no lack of resource displayed. The result of the game came as a big disappointing to Everton's supporters, for they are not accustomed to see their team worsted at all points of play, but if the wish to see their team come out successfully was not realised, they had the satisfaction of witnessing high class football that has really, if ever been excelled.

GLASGOW RANGERS V EVERTON

September 27, 1895. Birmingham Daily Post

At Ibrox, on a fast ground, before 8,000 spectators. The Rangers played McGowan, Muir (Late Queen's Park), and Burns (Ashfield). Everton were without Adams. The Rangers, with the wind, in the first half failed to score, the teams crossing over pointless. Latta scored two minutes after the restart, then Gibson equalised for the Rangers. Improving, the home team scored 2 more through Boyd, and McGowan, and won a fast game, Glasgow Rangers 3, Everton 1.

GLASGOW RANGERS 3 EVERTON 1

September 27 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The Everton team paid their usual visit to Ibrox Park, Glasgow, yesterday, the great holiday in Glasgow. The team travelled overnight to their destination, and had a short drive round previous to the match taking place. So as the fixture should not dash with Celtic and Sunderland, the kick off was timed for the unusual hour of half past twelve. The weather was of a more charming characters, but being midday and in spite of a rather nice breeze the astmoshere was much too warm for football. The Everton team were the first appear, and the sides lined up in the followings order: - Everton: - Hillman, goal, McDonald, and Storrier, backs, Stewart, Meiklejohn, and Boyle (captain), halfbacks, Latta, Mcinnes, Hartley, Flewitt, and Milward, forwards, Glasgow Rangers: - Yulle, goals, Drummend, (captain) and Crawford, half, Marshall, Burns, and Gibson, halfbacks, Boyd, Muir, McEwan, McCreadie, and Stewart, halfbaccks, forwards. Drummond won the toss, and of course took advantage of the wind, which was blowing from goal to goal; but owing to the nonappearance of two of the home team a considerable delay occurred. Upon Hartley starting, Boyd and Muir ran down the ball, and Hillman was compelled to run out to save. Directly following Stewart put in a long centre, which however, went astray. After this Everton came away with some capital forward work, and both Hartley and Flewitt had nice opportunities of scoring, but failed to do so. A hugh kick by Storrier put Everton again in possession, and after Latta, and McInne had carried the play well into the ememy's quarters the famous right winger sent wide of the desired direction. A foul off Stewart, was next item, rather close into the visitors goalmouth, but nothing came of it, and upon Flewitt, Hartley, and McInnes attempting to break away Burns put in a lot of grand work, both with his head and feet, and deservedly cheered. The Bulk of the play was confirmed to oneside of the field, the heavy kicking of Drummond and Crawford allowing to breeze to have great effect upon the leather, while the general play at the period was not of a very exciting nature. A brilliant rush by Hartley, who received from Storrier, earned a corner, but the ball was put in just a shade too high for the Everton middleman to reach it. Offside was effectual called against McEwan, who led up stinging attacks upon Hillman's charge, and after two corners kicks had fallen to the share of the Rangers. Burns removed all immediate danger by misdirecting wide of the goal. Following an attack by the visitors, McDonald let Boyd and Muir in, but without result. For a spell Everton had to act entirely on the defensive, Marshall, Burns, and Gibson (the Rangers halves) being in magnificent form, and as the wind up of a pretty sequence of passes by Stewart and McCreadidy the latter shot hard at Hillman, at short range, but the Evertonian dealt with the effort in capital style, as he did with several others which, rained in upon him in rapid succession from McEwan, Boyd, and Stewart. Weak passing by Flewitt spoiled a combined forward movement and upon half time being called the score sheet had not been requisitioned. Upon resuming after a lengthily interval, the Everton forwards shaped in much improved style, and first Latta and then Hartley made two splendid attempts, following up by Latta beaten Yullie the next moment. Everton now had slightly the better of the argument, and Hartley, when given a beautiful opening, drove high over the bar, at length Rangers forwards well supported by their halves, formulated a strong attack upon Hillman, and a Penalty kick was awarded against one of the Everton defence for tripping McEwan and Gibson scored at the second attempt. Clever work by Latta and McInnes as though another point for Everton was likely to secure but Crawford and Drummond defended gallantly, and Yulle was lucky in clearing. At last the rather monotonous character of the play became changed, and Muir introduced greater vigour and variety, with the result that McCreadie added a second point after Hillman had fisted out an attempt. In a trice an exhibitions of had judgements by McDonald deceived the Everton custodian and McEwan notched the third point, a simple affair altogether. The remaining stages of the game were distinctly in favour of Everton, who marred the performance by wretched shooting, whilst glaring infringement of the offside rule by the homesters were allowed to go unnoticed by the referee. Result Glasgow Rangers 3 goals Everton 1.

 

WOLVERHAMPTON WANDERERS 2 EVERTON 3 (game 188)

September 30 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The Everton team journeyed to Wolverhampton on Saturday to engage with the Wolves in the initial League fixture of the season. the day was gloriously fine, and as a good exposition of the game has always been the rule when Everton have visited the Wanderers, there was a capital attendance on the Molineux Ground long before the time for commencing play. When the season faced as follows there would be quite 12,000 spectators present: - Everton: - Hillman, goal, Parry and Adams, backs, Boyle (captain), Holt, and Stewart, halfbacks, Williams, mCinnes, Hartley, Cgadwick, and Milward, forwards. Wanderers: - Rose, goal, Baugh, and Dunn, backs, Nurse, Malpass and Owen halfbacks Wykes, Hendersson, Beats, Wood, and griffins, forwards . Everton won the toss, and on Betts setting the ball in motion, Chadwick at once made the running for Milward, and following a couple of hugh throwns from the touch line by Stewart, a raid was made on the Wolves defences when Baugh and Nurse put in a lot of work. Henderson eventually racing off, and being only pulled up by Parry when dangerous near goal. Holt had the better of beats in a race for possession, and placing the ball nicely to Hartley the latter rushed between Baugh and Malpass Williams racing to the centre with a clear course in front put he unfortunately kicked high over the bar. Again Beats led on his men and patted nicely to Wykes who in turn passed to Henderson, and Hillman was tested with a fairly hot shot, but fisted away all right, and minute later the ball was bobbing about Rose's charge. Baugh defended well, and after Nurse had put his wing in possession the whole of the Wolves line put in some grand passing touches that fairly pulverlised the Everton defendce. Following one of these raids Wood fastened on the ball and banged it into the net after nine minutes play. Getting to work again the home forwards ably fed by their halves again swarmed round Hillman's charge. A long punt Parry cleared the danger, and McInnes and Williams took up the running, only to be confronted by Dunn, who was ever ready, when danger threatened. A little later Stewart placed the ball nicely to Hartley, who in turn sent onto the right, and it was only by a matter of inches that the home goalkeeper was not defeated. After a smart spurt by Beats, Henderson, was penalised, and on Parry taking the kick, the ball was driven accurately towards the net, and after bobbling about for some seconds Baugh put an end to the progess by a hugh kick, which transferred the play to the other end. A pretty bit of combination between Hartley, Chadwick and Milward resulted in the last named swinging the ball across to McInnes who put it wide. Wolverhampton had a goal disallowed for off side, however a minute later Wyles had the Everton goal at his mercy, but made a very poor attempt and after Beats had also finished badly the same player got clean away from the goalkick, and defeated Hillman with a terrific shot. Nothing further was done up to the charge of ends, when Everton were two goals in arrear. Immediately on restarting there was a noticeable alteration in the method of the visitors. Having had a surfeit of short passing in the first half, which was not attended with success, they adopted the swinging across from wing to wing style of play, and, generally speaking they had much the better of their opponents in the coming play. Milward and Chadwick were very often effective in their play and after the latter had sent in a stringing shot, which Dunn headed out Milward fastened on the ball and sent in a stringing cross shot which, took effect eight minutes after the restart. This success fairly encourage the Evertonians, who infused such grit into their play that they appeared certain whenas, and when after the Wolves had visited and found Hillman in good settle, they came again and scored by McInnes from a free kick well placed by Parry, there appeared to be only one team in it. Baugh, Nurse, Beats, and wood worked hard to Check the disaster that had set in, and when there were prospects of a drawn game looming, Chadwick tried his luck, and but for the smart work or Rose in getting up to the corner it would undoubtedly have taken effect. However, the save was but a partial one, and as Hartley was on the look out for an opening he found his opportunity and headed the ball into the net, thus giving his side the lead. The Wolves now played up with frantic determination, and were often within an ace of equalising. Towards the finish Griffin put the ball into the net, but was ruled offside, and as nothing further was done Everton won a hard uphill game by 3 goals to 2.

 

EVERTON RESERVES 8 WREXHAM 0

September 30 1895. The Liverpool mercury

This combination match took place at Goodison Park, before a good crowd. Everton were powerfully represented, Everton winning at easy game by 8 goals to nil. Flewiit (3), Chadwick (2), Hill, Scholfield scoring for Everton . Everton: - Hiles, goals, McDonald, and Storrier, backs, Goldie, Meiklejohn, and Elliott, halfbacks, Reay, Hill, Chadwick (j), Hewitt and Scholfield, forwards.

 

EVERTON REVIEW

September 30 1895. The Liverpool Mercury

The scottish journay to Glasgow was not as successful at the Everton well wishes, would have liked it to be with the idea of giving a trial to scene of the younger blood, practically half a reserve team pitted, against the Rangers, who, singularly to state, also adopted the same fashion but the experiment; did not turn out anything like the success saticapted. McDonald opened well, but failed at the pinch. Storrier proved very adept at stopping the men and clearing the ball, but thew manner in which, it was performed does not recommend itself to a connessssant. Meiklejohn in the centre was never bad, and at the same time never brilliant. He is a plodder pure and simply. Flewitt was perhaps the poorest of the forwards, bit his judgements and conditions being at fault. Milward and he did not combine at all, so that the bulk of the work was upon Hartley, McInnes and Latta. Perhaps the feature of the play was the wretched and terribly aggravating shooting form of the visitors. As a matter of fact they had more chances than the home team, some of which were right under the bar, but shoot the leather into the net they could not. The play altogether, no doubt swing to the conditions under which it was played (midday), was of the as you please character and therefore very uninteresting. Several of the Rangers recruits especially the halves show good form and capacities.

The Everton team by their truly magnificent victory over Wolverhampton Wanderers on Saturday last have fully restored a confidence among their supporters which, it must be confessed had been of late on the wane and those pessimistic jeremiads who have been releasing the fortunate of the Blues to the lowest in the League tournament must have received a rude shook when the news reached them on Saturday evening. The choice of team was a difficult task for the executive to enter upon and when the services of such men as Kelso and Bell had to be dispensed with the situation to an ordinary observer it must be confessed, was not a particular brought one, especially as the team had to cope with opponents who have had been the course of several fluctuations in the fortune of the game that have happened in quarters where least experted. As an evidence of the support that is accordingly a winning team, the Molyneux ground was well patronished long before the advertised commencement of operations and at the kick off there would be quite 12,000 spectators round the well appointioned enclosure. The Wolves were very strongly represented, and the way they set about their work was sufficient quarantee to inspire confidence in even the most lukewarm supporter of the club. The Wolves forwards went about their work in the old North End style, and when they once got under weigh it was no light task to put the check upon them. The wings were kept employed, and it can safely be stated that twice out of three times they were in possession, and moreover dangerous. On the other hand, the Everton forwards were also adopting similar short passing tactics with but only a medium of Success, for had it been the sole task of the Wolves halves to lay close up, and hang like leeches to the Everton van, disparaging altogether the fact of their paying ant attention to their front line, they could not have preformed their mission to a greater degree of nicety. The game had been ten minutes in progess when the Everton custodian was defeated by Woods after a heavy fusillade on his charge; but the shot was so well judged and moreover along the ground at such extraordinary speed, that it is highly improbable that any goalkeeper could have attended to it successfully. This point gave the Wolves additional confidence, and they for the next quarter of an hour, simply swarmed round the Everton defenders, who were, however, alive to all executions, and it was only by consummate tact and skill that they kept their opponents from scoring on more than one occasion. After some very clever saves by Hillman a real beauty by the Wolves centre, and the chance of Everton at the interval were gloomy in the extreme. It was patent to any keen observer that the Wolves were quite capable, and well ashooled in the Everton style of attack, and if there was to be any possible chance of the Evertonians averting defeat it must result from a complete change of method. The situation was thoroughly grasped by the Everton skipper, and his confreres, and instead of the short passing, with opposing halfbacks literally lying on top of them, as was the case in the first half, they adopted long passing tactics, which resulted in drawing away both the first and second line of defence and eventually in gaining the victory. The success of Everton accured simply from a matter of generalship superior to that of the Wolves, and Saturday's display proved conclusively that the team although at one period of the game almost hopelessly beaten, which can change it tactics to the perplexity of its opponents will invariably come out strongly at the finish. It was quite refreshing to see the old time methods once again brought into play, and the three goals which, gave Everton the victory were like those against Hillman, altogether out of the reach of the custodian. Milward was the first to score, and it is questionable whether he ever piloted a ball more skillfully out of a goalkeeper's reach, although at a fair distance, and handicapped by an injured foot, McInnes obtained the second under the most unlooked conditions. There were two outside chance for scoring when he got possession close to the goalmouth, i.e, either to trust to driving the ball between a host of legs into the net or to attempt to tip the ball over the heads of halves and backs who defty blocked the goal. He chose the latter course, and it glided from the under portion of the crossbar into the rigging. Towards the close Chadwick had a long drive at Rose, and almost succeeded, with a stringing shot which, appeared to be out of the reach of Rose, but he partially saved it, only to see Hartley safely head it out of his reach. So much for the play, and now to the players. To commence with the victorious team, Hillman in goal despite the injury to his leg, mer met all exactions in good fashion, and the shots that defeated him were too adroitly placed, and sent in with such terrific force, for any goalkeeper to negotiate. Adams had a tough wing against him, and on the whole, came out remarkably well, some of his tackling of the Wolves as they steadied for shooting being exceptionally smart. Parry was some little time getting into his stride, and though he was occasionally beaten in the open, he was brimful of resource, when close in goal, and his judgement in placing the ball from a free kick was often most serviceable to his side. In the first portion of the game the display of the halfbacks was below the average, but following on the change of ends, whatever may have been their shortcoming at the outset, they more than made amends in the second period. Stewart worked hard and well and his hugh throwing in from touch was a very effective factor to the succcess of the team when near goal while Holt and Boyle especially in the closing stages, were more than a match for the Wolves forwards . Milward and Chadwick played a great game, and through Hartley lost a few chances early on, he justified his inclusion when the open game was resorted to. McInnes played a vastly improved game, and with Williams completed a strong line of attack. The Wolves forwards were too conservative in their style of play. As did Everton at the outset, they adopted the short passing line of action, at which they gave their opponents points, but they were not sufficiently astute to change their methods when they found fortune against them until there were a goal behind. Beats played a very fine centre forward game and with Wood got through a vast amount of work. While Griffin and Wyles, though the latter appealed to be somewhat indisposed, were not short of resources at critical moments. Nurse played effective left halfbacks game as also did Malpass in the centre and though Owen often contributed a good share, his work was marred by the rather vigorous methods he at time adopted. Baugh and Dunn, the former especially was magnificent defenders, and nothing short of the sudden change of tactics of the Evertonians would have brought about their downfall. Rose had little to do in the first half but in the second he was often called on, and did his work well. At the close of the proceedings a most disgraceful scene took place. The referee had occasion to rule the Wanderers left offside on putting the ball into the net, when close on time, and several times during the game his decisions were not accepted in a true sportsmanlike spirit. Immediately after the whistle blew a surging crowd bore down on Mr.Armitts end, but for the prompt assistance of police and officials series results have happened. Eventually the referee sought refuge in the pressbox, but it was not until some considerable time had elapsed that the crowd was cleared from the ground.